October/November Issue of LIVING BLUES Out Now

The October/November 2016 issue of Living Blues features the griot of the blues Taj Mahal on the cover. At age 74 Taj Mahal is one of the biggest stars in the blues today. His musical and cultural knowledge is vast and his desire to share this lifetime of knowledge is his enduring legacy.

August/September LIVING BLUES Available Now!

The August/September #244 issue of Living Blues shines a spotlight on the state of the blues in Jackson, Mississippi. Supported by a generous grant from the Jackson Convention and Visitors Bureau, this special edition of LB documents an under-the-radar, yet thriving local scene—one whose influential roots run deep.

A Preview of the Newest LIVING BLUES Magazine

The June 2016 issue of Living Blues features a cover story on guitarist and singer Barbara Lynn, best known for her 1962 hit You’ll Lose a Good Thing. From learning to play guitar in her youth to being sampled by rapper Lil’ Wayne, the Beaumont, Texas native looks back on her 54-year career.

LIVING BLUES Magazine Hires New Publication Manager

Melanie Young feels as though she’s come home since she’s been hired as the new publication manager of Living Blues magazine. She first began working with the magazine in 2009 as the circulation manager, and also had an editorial internship with the publication. Since then, she’s been a contributing writer for Living Blues and even wrote her Southern Studies master’s thesis on the magazine in 2012.

Music of the South Symposium to Explore Defining and Presenting Traditional Music

Music of the South Symposium:Defining and Presenting Tradition in Southern Music – Wednesday, April 6, 2016 This spring’s Music of the South Symposium will investigate the creation and performance of the South’s various traditional music forms. The one-day symposium, “Defining and Presenting Traditional Music,” sponsored by the Center, Living Blues magazine, and the Blues Archive,… Read More >

Journeyman Scholar: Adam Gussow Sings and Teaches the Blues

New York native Adam Gussow arrived on a hot and humid University of Mississippi campus in August of 2002, harmonica in hand. The Center for Study of Southern Culture was in need of a blues expert at the time, and he was exactly what they were looking for. Gussow said moving from Vassar College in New York state to small-town Mississippi was a big transition, but it was an ideal one.