SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) exploring the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted, and is free and open to the public.

To watch SouthTalks from the past,  visit our YouTube channel.


Apr
16
Tue
SouthTalks: Deep Inside the Blue @ Barnard Obervatory
Apr 16 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Deep Inside the Blue

Margo Cooper, Joe Ayers, and Trent Ayers

In this SouthTalk, photographer and author will be joined in conversation by blues musicians Joe Ayers and his son Trent Ayers. Cooper had the privilege of interviewing both Ayers men for her book Deep Inside the Blues. She describes Joe Ayers as kind, wise, and passionate about playing guitar. Trent Ayers grew up listening to a variety of blues music with his father—tapes of Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup, Muddy Waters, R. L. Burnside, and Junior Kimbrough, and Trent and his father recently worked on an album together called A Father Son Legacy. Joe and Trent Ayers will play music during this SouthTalk.

The panel will be moderated by Holly Harris, who comes from a musical family going back five generations. She is a veteran blues radio DJ/producer, and emcee in the Boston area.  She currently hosts Spinning the Blues on WUMB on Saturday and Thursday nights and hosts King Street Blues online. She is the percussionist with The One Dime Band, plays at Juke Joint Fest in Clarksdale, and is a recipient of a W.C. Handy award.

Margo Cooper’s recently published book, Deep Inside the Blues, collects 34 of her interviews with blues artists and is illustrated with more than 160 of her photographs. Many of the key blues players of the period have already passed, making their stories and Cooper’s photographs of them all the more poignant and valuable.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. Visit southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more information about all Center events.

black and white photo of man playing fife

Apr
18
Thu
SouthTalks: (I’m Not) Your Negroni film screening @ Overby Center Auditorium
Apr 18 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

(I’m Not) Your Negroni 

Film Screening and Discussion with Filmmaker Antonio Tarrell and Bartender/Bar Owner Joe Stinchcomb

Thursday, April 18 at 5 p.m. in Overby Center Auditorium

Award-winning bartender Joseph “Joe” Stinchcomb stirs up the small town of Oxford, Mississippi when he launches a craft cocktail menu honoring Black History Month.

Joseph Stinchcomb began his hospitality career working at Proud Larry’s. In 2016, he was named beverage director for Saint Leo. Saint Leo was nominated for best new restaurant in 2017 as well as outstanding beverage program in 2019 by the James Beard Foundation. By 2020, Stinchcomb was named a Sam Beall Fellow through Blackberry Farm and a Smith Fellow through the Southern Foodways Alliance. Stinchcomb’s bar and restaurant experience includes working at Blackberry Farm, Post Ranch Inn, French Laundry, and Hotel Jerome. In October 2021, Stinchcomb and business partner Ross Hester opened Bar Muse, an intimate craft cocktail bar located inside the Lyric Theatre.

Antonio Tarrell, hailing from Bruce, Mississippi, is a highly skilled and versatile filmmaker. With expertise in producing, directing, and cinematography, he has contributed his talents to a wide range of projects including feature films, commercials, and documentaries. Tarrell’s unwavering objective as a filmmaker is to create visually captivating images that not only advance the narrative but also have a profound emotional impact on the audience. Antonio Tarrell Films’ accomplishments include contributions to (I’m Not) Your Negroni (2024), 5th Step (2023), Robert Johnson: I Believe I’ll Go Back Home (2023), NHK (Japanese Broadcast: Mississippi Revealed (Mississippi Delta), 2022, Fox Business: Earth with John Holden (Arkansas), 2022, Mississippi Public Broadcast: Mississippi Roads (2022), Sites of Resistance and Healing (2022), David Sheffield: The Heartbreak Henry for Theater Oxford (2021), Discovery Channel: Earth hosted by John Holden (2021), PBS: Make America Black hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr (2021), CONDÉ NAST ENTERTAINMENT featuring Joseph Stinchcomb (2021), Black Privilege. White Power. (2020), Walk Against Fear: James Meredith for Smithsonian TV (2019), Restaurant Impossible: Revisited – Season 2 for Food Network (2019), Pilot Episode: Bluff City Law for NBC (2019), and many more.

Apr
23
Tue
SouthTalks: All Roads Lead to Holmes: Voices of Holmes County Oral History Project  @ Barnard Observatory
Apr 23 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

All Roads Lead to Holmes: Voices of Holmes County Oral History Project 

Film and Panel with Al Povall, Ora Reed, Phil Cohen, and Friends of Lexington Preservation

Tuesday, April 23 at 4 p.m. in Barnard Observatory

All Roads Lead to Holmes: Voices of Holmes County is a documentary project directed by Ed Ellington and produced by the Friends of Lexington Preservation in Holmes County, Mississippi, with support from the Mississippi Humanities Council. The documentary highlights the contributions of Holmes County natives to the Civil Rights Movement and captures stories of life in Holmes County. Students at the University of Mississippi’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture assisted in the creation of this work.

Apr
24
Wed
SouthTalks: “Cold War Country: Music Row, the Pentagon, and the Sound of American Patriotism” @ Barnard Observatory
Apr 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

“Cold War Country: Music Row, the Pentagon, and the Sound of American Patriotism”

Joseph M. Thompson

Country music maintains a unique, decades-long relationship to the US military, but these ties didn’t just happen. Joseph M. Thompson explores how country music’s Nashville-based business leaders on Music Row created partnerships with the Pentagon to sell their audiences on military service while selling country music to US servicemembers and international audiences. Beginning in the 1950s, the military flooded armed forces airwaves with the music, hosted tour dates at bases around the world, and drew on country music artists to support recruitment programs. Over the last half of the twentieth century, the close connections between the Defense Department and Music Row gave an economic boost to the white-dominated sounds of country while fueling divisions over the meaning of patriotism.

Joseph M. Thompson is assistant professor of history at Mississippi State University. His first book, Cold War Country: How Nashville’s Music Row and the Pentagon Created the Sound of American Patriotism, analyzes the economic and symbolic connections between the country music business and the military-industrial complex since World War II.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. Visit southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more information about all Center events.

illustration

May
1
Wed
SouthTalks: “Faulkner’s Enduring Queerness” @ Barnard Observatory
May 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Phillip “Pip” Gordon, UM visiting assistant professor of gender studies in the Sarah Isom Center for Women’s and Gender Studies, discusses “Faulkner’s Enduring Queerness” at noon May 1. Gordon discusses Faulkner’s relevance to broadening fields of trans and ace studies and the value such approaches have to our understanding of Faulkner and the South.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. Visit southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more information about all Center events.

May
3
Fri
Spring Documentary Showcase @ Barnard Observatory
May 3 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Gammill Gallery and Tupelo Room

Barnard Observatory

 Spring Documentary Showcase

The Spring Documentary Showcase is a celebration of the work by our documentary students. Each artist will present their work. Attendees will have an opportunity to engage with the artists and their work during a reception.