Spring SouthTalks Continue ‘Mississippi Voices’ Theme

Woman stands behind colorful bar

First lecture set for Jan. 26; schedule includes both virtual and in-person events The spring SouthTalks Series, sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi, continues the focus on “Mississippi Voices.” This theme finds connections to other places, problems and people that solidify the global interconnectedness made undeniable by the pandemic.

Vocalist Sugaray Rayford featured in latest issue of Living Blues

Living Blues #276 features vocalist Sugaray Rayford on the cover. Texas-born former Marine Rayford stands 6’5” and has a commanding stage presence. His career has been ascending for the last 20 years and, with a new CD about to drop, he is ready to hit the ground running post-COVID. Eighty-two-year-old Alabama Slim has been part

Virtual Open House set for Jan. 21

photo of Barnard Observatory with text announcing Virtual Open House Jan. 21 at 1 pm CT

Please join us for a Southern Studies open house for those interested in earning their M.A. or M.F.A. on Friday, Jan. 21 at 1 p.m. CT. This event is an opportunity for people to ask questions, meet faculty, staff, and current students, and learn more about the graduate programs at the Center for the Study

Fall Documentary Showcase set for Dec. 2

Text that says Fall Documentary Showcase at the Powerhouse Dec. 2 at 6:30 p.m.

The Center for the Study of Southern Culture’s Documentary Showcase will take place at the Powerhouse.  Students from various disciplines enrolled in Southern Studies documentary courses and graduate students in both the M.A. and M.F.A. programs will present projects they have worked on this semester. This fall’s event promises to be the biggest one yet, with

Living Blues features Toronzo Cannon

African American man wearing sunglasses and hat plays a Flying V guitar

Living Blues #275 features Toronzo Cannon on the cover. After 20 years of grinding, South Side bluesman Toronzo Cannon has honed his stage act and is now one of the top proponents of modern Chicago blues. Alex Dixon was raised by his grandparents—his grandfather just happened to be the legendary Willie Dixon. The young Dixon

Open Houses set for this month

green and white graphic with text about open houses

We are pleased to announce two Southern Studies open house opportunities. The first option is a virtual event set for Friday, Nov. 19 at 1 p.m. CT and the second option is in person, Friday, Dec. 3 at 1 p.m. CT. Both events are opportunities for people to ask questions, meet faculty, staff, and current

Center sponsors Theatre of War event

David Denman, Marjolaine Goldsmith, David Patrick Kelly and Nyasha Hatendi.

The University of Mississippi’s Department of Classics and Office of Veteran and Military Services is using the lens of ancient Greek literature to explore the emotional and social tension between soldiers and the societies that send them to war. The Veterans Day event, presented in partnership with Theater of War Productions, is designed to help

‘The Light in the Piazza’ Subject of Nov. 3 SouthTalk

older woman on left, young woman in middle, blue vespa, man

Several events celebrate Elizabeth Spencer’s 100th birthday The beloved characters created by Mississippi author Elizabeth Spencer are returning to the South with a University of Mississippi Opera Theatre production of “The Light in the Piazza,” which is the focus of a SouthTalk sponsored by the UM Center for the Study of Southern Culture. Composer Adam

Mississippi Creates: Schaefer Llana

The Center for the Study of Southern Culture and Yoknapatawpha Arts Council have teamed up for Mississippi Creates, an event that pairs musical performance with short documentary films providing a glimpse into the creative life and environments of two local musicians; Tyler Keith and Schaefer Llana. This pair of films are part of a larger

UM, Ecru Partners Working to Tell Story of M.B. Mayfield

Archival partnership helps shine light on one of university’s first Black students, acclaimed folk artist Tucked away in a broom closet within a University of Mississippi classroom, M.B. Mayfield earned a fine arts education in the 1950s the only way he could at the time. A folk artist, the Ecru native was not able to