Theda Perdue to Present 2015 Gilder-Jordan Lecture on Sept. 9

Gilder Jordan Program

On Wednesday, September 9 at 7pm in the University’s Nutt Auditorium, Theda Perdue of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will present the 2015 Gilder-Jordan Lecture in Southern History. Earlier in the day, Dr. Perdue will meet with graduate students in history and Southern Studies. Perdue’s talk is entitled “Indians and Christianity in… Read More >

Center Partners with Delta Blues Museum for Teacher Workshop Next Week

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The Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale is offering a 3-Day Teachers Workshop covering the Mississippi Blues Trail on Tuesday, July 28 – Thursday, July 30. Several people from the Center and the University will be helping, including Ted Ownby, Scott Barretta of Highway 61 Radio, Greg Johnson of the University Blues Archive, and Derrick Harriell of the UM Department of English.

Work with us at the Center!

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Would you like to join us in Barnard Observatory? The Center is now hiring for a part-time staff position who will handle general organizational and clerical tasks, serve as Building Mayor of Barnard, work with calendars and scheduling, and the like. For all the details and to apply, visit the University’s posting on the HR site.

Subuding Satan Turns 25

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This week, my book Subduing Satan: Recreation, Religion, and Manhood in the Rural South, 1865-1920, turns 25 years old. I remember the date because the book showed up in my mailbox the weekend I turned 30. As birthdays go, the 25th year of a work of history really doesn’t call for or deserve much attention. But it intrigues me to think about it, so I hope anyone reading this will forgive me if writing about my aging book seems a combination of self-congratulation, penitence, and nostalgia. Heaven knows southern history already has plenty of all three.

Center Director Ted Ownby On Current Efforts to Remove Confederate Symbols

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I’m not absolutely sure I need a state flag. I don’t wave state flags or salute them or wear them on my clothing. But as a resident of Mississippi since the 1980s and as scholar and teacher in History and Southern Studies, I want a different flag than the one we have. I want a state flag that stands for equal access to the law, to education, to health care, and to safety and respect.

Two Faculty Members Take Study of US South Abroad

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Two Southern Studies assistant professors are getting to use their passports this summer as recipients of the Provost’s Faculty Development Award for Campus Internationalization. Catarina Passidomo heads to Peru May 31–June 10 for “Peruvian Food Systems: Balancing Growth and Preservation,” and Jodi Skipper goes to Senegal June 7–17 for “Islam, Politics, and Culture in Senegal and West Africa.”

Southern Studies MA Program Draws Students from Abroad

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This article, by James G. Thomas, Jr., appears in the Spring 2015 issue of the Southern Register. Southern Studies Draws Students from Abroad The Center for the Study of Southern Culture is not unfamiliar to guests and visitors from beyond US borders. Whether they be scholars, students, or enthusiasts of Southern culture in general, the… Read More >

SouthDocs Film Wins Emmy for Best Historical Documentary

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The Toughest Job: William Winter’s Mississippi, a film by Matthew Graves of the Southern Documentary Project, won an Emmy for best historical documentary from the Southeast division of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The awards were announced on Saturday, June 6 in Atlanta, and Graves attended the ceremony. “It was such an… Read More >