New Gammill Gallery Exhibit by Jaime Johnson

Aligning with the tradition of Southern Gothic, Jaime Johnson’s Untamed articulates humankind’s capacity to decay as a marker of our identity. Set in the swamps and woods of Mississippi and Louisiana, natural places where one encounters life and death, growth and decay, Untamed depicts the fictitious story of a feral woman and her companions.

New STUDY THE SOUTH Essay by James Carson

The South’s antiquity is here whether we want it or not. Our predicament is to decide whether or not we want to allow it to be here. To leave this past unseen and unstated is to accept the kind of amputated humanity we have been dealt by what we imagine to be a noble, if fraught, past. In reality, that past is just a story of theft. Legitimacy can’t be found nor can it be contrived. It can only be earned. We need to understand that what happened at Jamestown, and Stono, and Cowpens, and Appomattox, and Selma are in some ways just so many quick breaths taken in a very long life.

A Fond Farewell to Mark Camarigg of LIVING BLUES

A Fond Farewell to MARK CAMARIGG of LIving Blues The Center says goodbye this month to our friend Mark Camarigg, who has worked as Publications Manager for Living Blues since 2003. Mark worked with Living Blues editor Brett Bonner on innovative ways to market and distribute the magazine, dealt with subscribers, maintained the website, oversaw… Read More >

Snapshots from the Semester – Grad Student Guest Post

Here, an end of the semester photo wrap-up with second year Southern Studies grad student Sophie Hay, who documents Center events and life as part of her assistantship. Follow the Center on Instagram for more photos by Sophie and others. Snapshots from the Semester Fall semester has been a busy one in Barnard Observatory; the… Read More >

New STUDY THE SOUTH Essay by David Wharton

In a cultural climate based on the superficial, one has to wonder how much deeper the annual Elvis Death Day observances go than mere tradition and habit. Can such events be mined for anything worth knowing about the world we live in today? Was there more to be learned from Death Day ten years ago? Twenty years ago? Thirty? Those might be the most interesting questions of all to ask about what happens in Memphis on August 15.

Save the Date for the Oxford Conference for the Book

The 23rd Annual Oxford Conference for the Book (OCB) is set for March 2–4, 2016, to bring together fiction and nonfiction writers, journalists, poets, publishers, teachers, and students for three days of readings, lectures, panels, workshops, and social events that celebrate the written word.

Southern Studies Grad Students Introduce the New First-Year Class

The members of the 2017 MA cohort have never met a stranger—including each other. Our fast bond stems from shared appreciation of Southern music, happy hour, and good food. We’re excited to spend the new two years collaborating with each other, especially considering the wide range of backgrounds we bring to the table. Here, we introduce ourselves and our favorite songs, in the hope that you will join us for a karaoke night out.

The Center Welcomes Three New Faces This Fall

Those who have attended the Center’s weekly Brown Bag Lecture Series and other events in Barnard Observatory over the years will now be greeted by a new receptionist—one who may, in fact, be recognizable. In early September, Margaret Gaffney joined the Center staff as its new staff assistant.

The Center Remembers Longtime Supporter Becky Feder

The Center Remembers Longtime Supporter Becky Feder We were very sad to learn of the passing of Becky Feder last week after a short fight with cancer. Becky, with her husband Ron, have for many years supported various Center programs through their foundation, the R&B Feder Foundation for the Beaux Arts. The Feders have been… Read More >