Oct
24
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: Amira Rose Davis, “Sights Unseen: Black Women Athletes and the (in)Visibility of Political Engagement” @ Barnard Observatory
Oct 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Amira Rose Davis will present “Sights Unseen: Black Women Athletes and the (in)Visibility of Political Engagement,” a brief history of black women’s athletic activism that focuses on how black women athletes have been hypervisible yet oft-ignored symbols of various political struggles on and off the playing field. An assistant professor of history and women’s gender, and sexuality studies at Penn State University, Davis received her doctorate in history from Johns Hopkins University. She specializes in twentieth-century American history with an emphasis on race, gender, sports, and politics, and her research traces the long history of black women’s athletic labor and symbolic representation in the United States. She is currently working on her forthcoming book manuscript, “‘Can’t Eat a Medal’: The Lives and Labors of Black Women Athletes in the Age of Jim Crow.” Davis is also the cohost of the feminist sports podcast, Burn It All Down.

Oct
31
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: Stephanie Rolph, “Resisting Equality: The Citizens’ Council, 1954–1989” @ Barnard Observatory
Oct 31 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

In this lecture, Stephanie Rolph will discuss her new book, Resisting Equality: The Citizens’ Council, 1954–1989. Rolph is a native of Jackson and a Millsaps alumna (1999). She earned her MA in 2004 and her PhD in 2009 from Mississippi State University, where she specialized in the history of the American South. An active scholar in post-1945 southern politics and conservative ideology, Rolph’s work has appeared in The Right Side of the Sixties and in the Journal of Southern History. Her first book, Resisting Equality: The Citizens’ Council, 1954–1989, was recently published by LSU Press.

 

Nov
7
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: Visiting Documentarian Series: Lisa Richman, “‘Introducing America to Americans’: FSA Photography and the Construction of Racialized and Gendered Citizens” @ Barnard Observatory
Nov 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Lisa Richman is interested in the ways images can reinforce, script, or challenge the national imaginary of who is a citizen. Historians and artists have examined the Farm Security Administration-Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) Photographic Collection as a broad and deep account of the Depression-era US experience and as a valuable collection of early documentary photography. During the Depression, FSA photographs had everyday life implications for those experiencing rural poverty; the images were made and circulated in order to garner support for rural rehabilitation programs. Simultaneously, the images were circulated as visual representations of “Americans” and the rural US citizen. In her talk, “‘Introducing America to Americans’: FSA Photography and the Construction of Racialized and Gendered Citizens,” Richman considers the FSA-OWI Photographic Collection project within the historical moment in which it was created, with a specific focus on the influence of dominant constructions of race, motherhood, and poverty. Specifically, Richman looks at photos of Mexican-American mothers and families that were made but were left almost wholly unseen—invisible. She argues that representations of Mexican mothers reflected and reinforced the gendered racialization of Mexicans in the US at the time. Analysis of representations of Mexican mothers unveils a history of marginalization and exclusion through the lack of existing images, the lack of varied representation, and the lack of circulation. She looks at the cultural stories that were reinforced and disseminated by FSA photography and the continued resonance that these stories have in the contemporary moment. Richman is a researcher and teacher at Adrian College with a doctorate in American culture studies from Bowling Green State University.

Nov
14
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: Jeff Washburn, “Whose Civilization Plan Was It? Chickasaw Manipulation of Federal Agents in the Early Nineteenth Century” @ Barnard Observatory
Nov 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Jeff Washburn is a PhD candidate and graduate instructor in the Arch Dalrymple III Department of History at the University of Mississippi. His talk will be “Whose Civilization Plan Was It? Chickasaw Manipulation of Federal Agents in the Early Nineteenth Century.”

Nov
28
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: Patrick Alexander, “Writing to Survive, Writing to Revive: Death Row, Willie Francis, and Imprisoned Radical Intellectualism in Ernest Gaines’s A Lesson Before Dying” @ Barnard Observatory
Nov 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Patrick Elliot Alexander is University of Mississippi associate professor of English and African American studies and cofounder of the University of Mississippi Prison-to-College Pipeline Program. In his lecture “Writing to Survive, Writing to Revive: Death Row, Willie Francis, and Imprisoned Radical Intellectualism in Ernest Gaines’s A Lesson before Dying,” Alexander will revisit the Jim Crow–era plot of Ernest Gaines’s novel A Lesson before Dying in the more contemporary carceral context of its publication. Alexander’s lecture reconsiders the cultural significance of Gaines’s most acclaimed novel in light of its release during our post–civil rights era of racialized mass incarceration, an epoch in which reports of prisoner abuse have soared from within a profit-driven system of social isolation responsible for the punitive confinement of one in every ninety-nine US adults and more black men than had been enslaved in 1850. It is Alexander’s contention that in Lesson, Gaines—through his depiction of an astute critic of the justice system who also happens to be a wrongfully convicted black death row prisoner—introduces to the field of African American fiction what Dylan Rodríguez has theorized in critical prison studies scholarship as an imprisoned radical intellectual. By revisiting the extensive, largely unexplored process that Gaines went through to create this death-sentenced protagonist—including Gaines’s repeated requests while writing Lesson to visit with a man on death row at Angola (Louisiana State Penitentiary); his witnessing of imprisonment on death row and the execution of prisoners as a young writer; and his prolonged reflection on the botched electrocution and re-execution of Willie Francis, a black adolescent from his home state of Louisiana—Alexander makes the case that Gaines’s novel amplifies the voices of a growing body of intellectuals behind razor wire who expose and oppose slavery’s vestiges in the prison system, vestiges that show up as racial bias, prisoner abuse, and premature death.

Mar
27
Wed
Oxford Conference for the Book @ Oxford, Mississippi
Mar 27 @ 7:11 pm – Mar 29 @ 8:11 pm