Study the South Announces Recipient of Research Fellowship

The Center for the Study of Southern Culture is pleased to announce that Bobby J. Smith II is the first recipient of the Study the SouthResearch Fellowship. The award provides the opportunity for funded research in the collections of the Department of Archives and Special Collections at the J. D. Williams Library at the University of Mississippi.

Catarina Passidomo Receives Fulbright Award to Study Foodways in Peru

University of Mississippi professor Catarina Passidomo is looking forward to traveling to Lima, Peru, to teach and conduct research in 2019 as the recipient of a Fulbright US Scholar award. While in Lima, the UM assistant professor of anthropology and Southern Studies will teach two courses in the Department of Social Sciences at the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. She also plans to engage in independent and collaborative research on Peruvian cuisine and foodways for a project titled “Gastrodiplomacy in Peru: Cuisine as Nation-Brand in Postcolonial Context.”

MISSISSIPPI ENCYCLOPEDIA and POTLIKKER PAPERS Recognized by MIAL

The Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters has awarded Center publication The Mississippi Encyclopedia its 2018 Special Achievement Award, and John T. Edge, Director of the Southern Foodways Alliance, has received the MIAL Nonfiction award for his book The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South.

An Interview with John T Edge about The Potlikker Papers, Eating Democratically, and Foodways in Cultural Studies

My fellow Southern Studies MA alum John T and I over many years have talked about how food, shelter, and clothing hold the keys to learning about the lives of southern people, many of whom embody the collision of necessity and creativity that is at the root of cultural studies. In this interview about his new book, The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South, we discuss the tension between the essential and the complex, something he brilliantly struggles with as a founder of the academic discipline of foodways, and something I’ve thought about in my own past work in the building arts and research on clothing and fashion in the South.

New MISSISSIPPI STORY on the Jewish Community of Natchez

There has been a Jewish community in Natchez, Mississippi for 175 years—and Robin Amer’s family has been part of it for 160 of them. But now the number of Jews in Natchez has dwindled to only a handful. In this audio story, Robin returns to learn what culinary culture might disappear when they’re gone.

SFA Oral History Stories of the Saltwater South, Nashville’s Nolensville Rd, Slug Burgers, and Links

Check out a slideshow of highlights from the SFA’s oral history programming so far in 2016, shown recently at the Fall Symposium. Led by Oral Historian Sara Wood, the SFA tells the stories of the farmers, fisherman, cooks, and entrepreneurs who feed the South, opening discussions of history and identity, and engaging with race, class, gender, and sexuality.

Alum Katie King to Screen Film at Atlanta History Center Feb. 4

Alum Katie King to Screen Film at Atlanta History Center Katie King (M.A. 2015) made a documentary film, The Sweet Auburn Curb Market, as part of her studies while in the graduate program at the Center. Katie will screen the film at the Atlanta History Center this Thursday, February 4 at 7pm. A panel discussion with… Read More >

Snapshots from the Semester – Grad Student Guest Post

Here, an end of the semester photo wrap-up with second year Southern Studies grad student Sophie Hay, who documents Center events and life as part of her assistantship. Follow the Center on Instagram for more photos by Sophie and others. Snapshots from the Semester Fall semester has been a busy one in Barnard Observatory; the… Read More >

New STUDY THE SOUTH Article by Jaime Cantrell

Center journal Study the South has a new article by Jaime Cantrell, “Put a Taste of the South in Your Mouth: Carnal Appetites and Intersextionality.”

Jaime Cantrell’s essay reveals the tactile resonances, social dimensions, and affective possibilities of thinking sex through southern food in fiction and poetry from Dorothy Allison, doris davenport, and Minnie Bruce Pratt.