Brian Foster’s SST 102: The Southern Protest Mixtape

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Brian Foster, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Southern Studies, is teaching Honors Southern Studies 102 this semester. The interdisciplinary course is structured as an examination of southern protest culture, and organized like a mixtape. See excerpts from his syllabus below. This is part of an occasional series in which we share syllabi from Southern Studies courses.

Grad Student Guest Post: What to Do When You Don’t Know What to Do

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Graduate school comes to us all in different ways: you might read a book that piques your interest, you might have a passion for a particular cuisine, you might have a career goal that requires a higher degree. Or you could be like me, and apply to graduate school because you’re just not sure what’s coming next. Two years ago I was finishing up a student teaching internship that just wasn’t fitting and I found myself wondering what on earth would come next, often out loud and often to my dog.

Gilder-Jordan Lecture Recap: Edward L. Ayers

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Edward L. Ayers of the University of Richmond was our 2016 Gilder-Jordan Lecturer on Wednesday, September 7. The Gilder-Jordan lecturer spends the day with faculty and students from the Center and History Department before delivering the evening lecture.

First Center Documentary Workshop Introduces Filmmaking to Southern Studies Students

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First Center Documentary Workshop Introduces Filmmaking to Southern Studies Students The Center held its first Documentary Workshop for Southern Studies graduate students August 15-17. Over three days, incoming first years Rachel Childs and Victoria Deleone and second year Rebecca Lauck Cleary learned approaches to documentary fieldwork, how to compose and shoot an interview, and how… Read More >

On Violence in the South: Criminal Justice through the Civil Rights Era

Chief of police talking to CIO pickets outside a mill in Greensboro, Greene County, Georgia

This week, in a response to violent events across the nation, the Center has shared a series of articles from the 2011 Violence volume of the New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. Today, we close the series with a look at criminal justice in the South through the civil rights era by Christopher Waldrep of San Francisco State University. So far this week we’ve featured entries on Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Jessie Daniel Ames, antilynching activism, and nonviolent protest.

On Violence in the South: Nonviolent Protest

Selma to Montgomery March, 1965. Courtesy Library of Congress.

As a response to violence and the issues it raises, and how people have opposed it, the Center is running a series of entries from the New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture volume on Violence, published in 2011. So far this week we’ve featured entries on Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Jessie Daniel Ames, and antilynching activism. Today, an article by Charles Reagan Wilson on nonviolent protest.

On Violence in the South: Antilynching Activism

Group marching near the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., to protest the lynching of four African-Americans in Georgia. Courtesy Library of Congress

As a response to violence and the issues it raises, and how people have opposed it, the Center will be running a series of entries from the New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture volume on Violence, published in 2011. So far this week we’ve featured entries on Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Jessie Daniel Ames. Today, an article by Karlos K. Hill of Texas Tech University on Antilynching Activism.

On Violence in the South: Jessie Daniel Ames

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As a response to violence and the issues it raises, and how people have opposed it, the Center will be running a series of entries from the New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture volume on Violence, published in 2011. Today, an entry on Jessie Daniel Ames by Marie S. Jemison. Yesterday, we featured the entry on Ida B. Wells-Barnett.

On Violence in the South: Ida B. Wells-Barnett

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As a response to violence and the issues it raises, the Center will be running a series of entries from the New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture volume on Violence. Today we start with the entry on Ida B. Wells-Barnett by scholar Patricia A. Schechter.