Journeyman Scholar: Adam Gussow Sings and Teaches the Blues

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New York native Adam Gussow arrived on a hot and humid University of Mississippi campus in August of 2002, harmonica in hand. The Center for Study of Southern Culture was in need of a blues expert at the time, and he was exactly what they were looking for. Gussow said moving from Vassar College in New York state to small-town Mississippi was a big transition, but it was an ideal one.

Snapshots from the Semester – Grad Student Guest Post

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Here, an end of the semester photo wrap-up with second year Southern Studies grad student Sophie Hay, who documents Center events and life as part of her assistantship. Follow the Center on Instagram for more photos by Sophie and others. Snapshots from the Semester Fall semester has been a busy one in Barnard Observatory; the… Read More >

New STUDY THE SOUTH Essay by David Wharton

Elvis, and Those Who (Still) Love Him

In a cultural climate based on the superficial, one has to wonder how much deeper the annual Elvis Death Day observances go than mere tradition and habit. Can such events be mined for anything worth knowing about the world we live in today? Was there more to be learned from Death Day ten years ago? Twenty years ago? Thirty? Those might be the most interesting questions of all to ask about what happens in Memphis on August 15.

We’re Hiring! Joint Faculty Appointment in Sociology/Anthropology and Southern Studies

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Faculty Job Posting: Assistant Professor of Sociology or Anthropology and Southern Studies The Department of Sociology and Anthropology (socanth.olemiss.edu) and the Center for the Study of Southern Culture (southernstudies.olemiss.edu) at the University of Mississippi invite applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Sociology or Anthropology with a joint appointment in Southern Studies starting Fall… Read More >

Center Faculty and Students Visit Site of Till Trial

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Last Friday, August 28, was the 60th Anniversary of the murder of Emmett Till in Money, Mississippi. On Saturday, the Emmett Till Interpretive Center in Sumner hosted several commemoration events, including tours of the newly renovated Sumner County Courthouse, where Till’s murderers were acquitted. Faculty members Ted Ownby, Jessie Wilkerson, Jodi Skipper, Katie McKee, and David Wharton attended the commemoration with several grad students. Below

Center Partners with Delta Blues Museum for Teacher Workshop Next Week

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The Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale is offering a 3-Day Teachers Workshop covering the Mississippi Blues Trail on Tuesday, July 28 – Thursday, July 30. Several people from the Center and the University will be helping, including Ted Ownby, Scott Barretta of Highway 61 Radio, Greg Johnson of the University Blues Archive, and Derrick Harriell of the UM Department of English.

Subuding Satan Turns 25

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This week, my book Subduing Satan: Recreation, Religion, and Manhood in the Rural South, 1865-1920, turns 25 years old. I remember the date because the book showed up in my mailbox the weekend I turned 30. As birthdays go, the 25th year of a work of history really doesn’t call for or deserve much attention. But it intrigues me to think about it, so I hope anyone reading this will forgive me if writing about my aging book seems a combination of self-congratulation, penitence, and nostalgia. Heaven knows southern history already has plenty of all three.

Center Director Ted Ownby On Current Efforts to Remove Confederate Symbols

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I’m not absolutely sure I need a state flag. I don’t wave state flags or salute them or wear them on my clothing. But as a resident of Mississippi since the 1980s and as scholar and teacher in History and Southern Studies, I want a different flag than the one we have. I want a state flag that stands for equal access to the law, to education, to health care, and to safety and respect.

Two Faculty Members Take Study of US South Abroad

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Two Southern Studies assistant professors are getting to use their passports this summer as recipients of the Provost’s Faculty Development Award for Campus Internationalization. Catarina Passidomo heads to Peru May 31–June 10 for “Peruvian Food Systems: Balancing Growth and Preservation,” and Jodi Skipper goes to Senegal June 7–17 for “Islam, Politics, and Culture in Senegal and West Africa.”