Mar
7
Wed
Brown Bag: “A Shrine for the State: Franklin D. Roosevelt, the New Deal, and Religious Remembrance at Warm Springs, Georgia” @ Barnard Observatory
Mar 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Brown Bag: "A Shrine for the State: Franklin D. Roosevelt, the New Deal, and Religious Remembrance at Warm Springs, Georgia" @ Barnard Observatory

MARCH 7 at noon 

Darren Grem
“A Shrine for the State: Franklin D. Roosevelt, the New Deal, and Religious Remembrance at Warm Springs, Georgia”

Focusing on Warm Springs, Georgia, where Franklin D. Roosevelt died in April, 1945, this talk will detail how New Dealers and other liberals memorialized their approach toward the federal state, business, race, and gender through religious language and imagery.

Grem is assistant professor of history and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. His research sits at the intersection of southern studies, business history, cultural history, and political history. His first book, The Blessings of Business: How Corporations Shaped Conservative Christianity, was published by Oxford University Press in 2016. His current book project is tentatively titled Hard Times, USA: The Great Depression in American Memory.

Apr
4
Wed
Brown Bag: “New Orleans and the New Southern Food Movement” @ Barnard Observatory
Apr 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Brown Bag: "New Orleans and the New Southern Food Movement" @ Barnard Observatory

APRIL 4 at noon

Catarina Passidomo
“New Orleans and the New Southern Food Movement”

Passidomo has a joint appointment in anthropology and Southern Studies, and works closely with the Southern Foodways Alliance. Her research interests include Southern foodways, critical race studies, social justice, food systems, social movements, and the connections between food and culture, identity, space and power. She holds a PhD in human geography from the University of Georgia, an MA in ecological anthropology from the University of Georgia, and a BA in sociology and anthropology from Washington and Lee University.

Apr
11
Wed
Brown Bag: “‘Cautious but Solid Character’: Southern Feminists and the State” @ Barnard Observatory
Apr 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

APRIL 11 at noon

Jennifer Bingo Gunter
“‘Cautious but Solid Character’: Southern Feminists and the State”

Gunter’s talk is an investigation of the interactions of feminists and the state from 1966 through 1985. Nationally, women cooperated with officials of state agencies to push their agenda of self-sovereignty. Inspired by the Second Wave of the women’s movement, southern women worked with the state and manipulated state reactions to suit their needs.

Jennifer “Bingo” Gunter is a historian who specializes in the intersections of gender, race, health, law, and activism. Her upbringing by a feminist in Mississippi has led her to focus on inequalities and empowerment. With a passion for public history she looks for ways to bridge the town-gown gap. She now resides in Columbia, South Carolina, with her husband, two dachshunds, and a cat.

Apr
18
Wed
Brown Bag: “Saving Slave Houses” @ Barnard Observatory
Apr 18 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

APRIL 18 at noon

Jobie Hill
“Saving Slave Houses”

Since 2011 Jobie Hill’s research and professional work has focused exclusively on domestic slave buildings. She is engaged in interdisciplinary research examining the dwellings of American slavery, the influence these dwellings had on the lives of their inhabitants, and the preservation of slave history. In 2012 she started an independent project titled the Slave House Database in an effort to ensure that slave houses, irreplaceable pieces of history, are not lost forever.