Jan
27
Wed
SouthTalks: “Nonviolence Before King: The Politics of Being and the Black Freedom Struggle” @ Online
Jan 27 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

In early 1960 Black students across the nation launched nonviolent direct-action campaigns in more than seventy cities across the nation, challenging Jim Crow segregation and violence. These students took courageous action knowing they would face arrest, expulsion, or even lose their lives. So why did they do it? Anthony Siracusa argues that the political philosophy of religious nonviolence was a key motivation for many. Siracusa excavates the history of this idea in his forthcoming book, Nonviolence Before King: The Politics of Being and the Black Freedom Struggle, and explains how what he calls a “politics of being” came to occupy a central place in the Black freedom struggle.

The bus that was firebombed during the Freedom Rides of 1961 in Anniston, Alabama.

A historian of modern America and a civic engagement professional in higher education, Anthony Siracusa works at the intersection of the community and the academy. He has written extensively about nonviolence and the Black freedom movement, and his first book, Nonviolence Before King: The Politics of Being and the Black Freedom Struggle, will be released by UNC Press in June 2021. He teaches a variety of courses on African American history, religion, and politics in addition to community-based learning courses. He also develops and administers projects and programs in partnership with communities beyond the campus to enhance student learning and strengthen community impacts. Siracusa is a native of Memphis, Tennessee, and lives in Oxford, Mississippi.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

Feb
10
Wed
SouthTalks: “Southern Journey: The Migrations of the American South, 1790–2020” @ Online
Feb 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

 

In this talk, Edward L. Ayers narrates the evolution of southern history from the founding of the nation to the present day by focusing on the set­tling, unsettling, and resettling of the South. Using migration as the dominant theme of southern his­tory and including Indigenous, white, Black, and immigrant people in the story, Ayers cuts across the usual geographic, thematic, and chronological boundaries that subdivide southern history.

Ayers explains the major contours and events of the southern past from a fresh perspective, weav­ing geography with history in innovative ways. He uses unique color maps created with sophisticated tools to in­terpret massive data sets from a humanistic per­spective, providing a view of movement within the South with a clarity, detail, and continuity we have not seen before. The South has never stood still; it is—and always has been—changing in deep, radical, sometimes contradictory ways, often in divergent directions. Ayers will be in conversation with Ted Ownby, professor of history and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi.

Edward L. Ayers has been named National Professor of the Year, received the National Humanities Medal from President Obama at the White House, won the Bancroft, Beveridge, and Lincolns Prizes in American history, was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, served as president of the Organization of American Historians, and worked as the founding chair of the board of the American Civil War Museum. He is executive director of New American, dedicated to sharing innovative work in words, maps, audio, and video with broad audiences and the nation’s schools. He is Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities and president emeritus at the University of Richmond, as well as a former dean of arts and sciences at the University of Virginia.

Ted Ownby is William F. Winter Professor of History and Southern Studies, coeditor of The Mississippi Encyclopedia, and author of Hurtin’ Words: Debating Family Problems in the Twentieth-Century South and other works.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

Feb
24
Wed
SouthTalks: “The Emmett Till Generation: Youth Activism, Radical Protest, and Social Change in Jim Crow Mississippi” @ Online
Feb 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm


Daphne Chamberlain’s talk highlights the role of children as leaders and participants in the Mississippi civil rights movement between 1946 and 1965. This presentation also offers a new perspective on the origins of the civil rights struggle and gives credence to how instrumental young people were to engaging in radical protest and grassroots activism in Mississippi.

Chamberlain completed her undergraduate studies at Tougaloo College in 2001 and received her M.A. and Ph.D. in history from the University of Mississippi. Before returning to Tougaloo as a faculty member, Chamberlain was the founding director of the COFO Civil Rights Education Center at Jackson State University. In 2013 Chamberlain returned to Tougaloo College, where she is an associate professor of history and the associate provost and vice president for academic affairs.

This event is sponsored by the Mississippi Humanities Council.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

Sep
21
Tue
Gilder Jordan Lecture: “The Price of the Ticket: Paying for Diversity and Inclusion” @ Online
Sep 21 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

“The Price of the Ticket: Paying for Diversity and Inclusion”  by Deborah Gray White

Many colleges and universities have added “diversity and inclusion” to their mission statements in recent years, but these goals have financial and emotional costs and are not achieved without intentional and thoughtful effort to dismantle the structures that perpetuate exclusion and homogeneity. Rutgers University began this process in 2015 by delving into its history and exploring how and why the structures that excluded African Americans for more than 200 years were created. For this year’s Gilder-Jordan Lecture in Southern Cultural History, Rutgers history professor Deborah Gray White will talk about that history and the price Rutgers paid, and is paying, to make the diversity that it advertises a reality.

The title of White’s lecture is “The Price of the Ticket: Paying for Diversity and Inclusion,” which she will deliver at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 21. This will be a virtual, online event.

Along with delivering the Gilder-Jordan Lecture, White will meet online with graduate students from across the UM campus at 9 a.m. to discuss her work with the Rutgers students who researched and wrote most of the essays published in Rutgers’ “Scarlet and Black” university history. Her discussion with graduate students will cover the value of this kind of research, including the benefits of researching outside of one’s field of expertise, doing collaborative work, entering the job market with published material, and learning the ins and outs of academic publishing. If you are a UM graduate student interested in this session, register here.

Deborah Gray White is Board of Governors Distinguished Professor of History at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. She is a specialist in the history of African American women. Author of “Ar’n’t I a Woman? Female Slaves in the Plantation South” and “Too Heavy a Load: Black Women in Defense of Themselves, 1894–1994,” White is also editor of “Telling Histories: Black Women in the Ivory Tower,” a collection of personal narratives written by African American women historians that chronicle the entry of Black women into the historical profession and the development of the field of Black women’s history. She currently codirects the “Scarlet and Black Project,” which investigates American Indians and African Americans in the history of Rutgers University.

Organized through the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, the African American studies program, Center for Civil War Research, and the Department of History, the Gilder-Jordan Speaker Series is made possible through the generosity of the Gilder Foundation, Inc. The series honors the late Richard Gilder of New York and his family, as well as University of Mississippi alumni Dan and Lou Jordan of Virginia.

Register for White’s lecture here. 

Oct
6
Wed
The Fannie Lou Hamer Story @ Ford Center for the Performing Arts
Oct 6 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

On Wednesday, Oct. 6 at 7:30 p.m. at the Gertrude Ford Center for the Performing Arts, in a production of “The Fannie Lou Hamer Story,” Mzuri Moyo Aimbaye channels Fannie Lou Hamer in a riveting 60-minute journey of storytelling showered with eleven inspiring songs and a video montage of the civil rights movement.  The Fannie Lou Hamer Story is part of the Ford Center’s Artist Series, which is supported by the University of Mississippi and in collaboration with the Center for the Study of Southern Culture and The Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement. Tickets are available here.