Sep
23
Wed
SouthTalks: “The Lebanese in Mississippi: An Oral History” @ Online
Sep 23 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

James G. Thomas, Jr. and Jessica Wilkerson present “The Lebanese in Mississippi: An Oral History” as part of the Movement and Migration Series.

The Zoom link is https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/94844636260.

James G. Thomas, Jr.’s recent work “The Lebanese in Mississippi: An Oral History” documents and interprets the lives of first- and subsequent-generation Lebanese Mississippians whose families immigrated to the state looking for a better life. It is an oral record of their forbears’ experiences of settling in a foreign land where they knew few people, did not speak the language, and had to create their own occupations. Ultimately, however, it is the collective story of maintaining an ethnic identity while assimilating into a new culture. Thomas’s work provides a picture of a people remembering, envisioning, and interpreting where they came from and the struggles of those who came before them. In this live Q&A, Thomas and Wilkerson discuss the origins and findings of Thomas’s study. The project can be found online at www.thelebaneseinmississippi.com.

Originally from the Mississippi Delta, James G. Thomas, Jr. is the associate director for publications at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. He holds a BA in English and philosophy, an MA in Southern Studies, and an MFA in documentary expression, each from the University of Mississippi.

Jessica Wilkerson is associate professor of history at West Virginia University, where she holds the Stuart and Joyce Robbins Chair, a position she began in fall of 2020 after spending six years at the University of Mississippi. She is the author of To Live Here, You Have to Fight: How Women Led Appalachian Movements for Social Justice.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. As a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events. The Movement and Migration Series Lectures in the spring of 2020 featured programming around the theme “Movement and Migration in, to, and through the US South” as a way of thinking about urgent issues connected to borders and belonging.

Oct
13
Tue
Gilder-Jordan Lecture: Carol Anderson @ Online
Oct 13 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Carol Anderson

Carol Anderson is the Charles Howard Candler Professor and Chair of African American Studies at Emory University.

She is the author of Eyes Off the Prize: The United Nations and the African-American Struggle for Human Rights, 1944-1955, which was published by Cambridge University Press and awarded both the Gustavus Myers and Myrna Bernath Book Awards; as well as, Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941-1960, which was also published by Cambridge.

Her third book, White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of our Racial Divide, won the 2016 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism and is also a New York Times Bestseller and a New York Times Editor’s Pick, and listed on the Zora List of 100 Best Books by Black Woman Authors since 1850.

Her most recent book, One Person, No Vote:  How Voter Suppression is Destroying our Democracy, was Long-listed for the National Book Award in Non-Fiction and was a finalist for the PEN/Galbraith Book Award in Non-Fiction.

Her young adult adaptation of White Rage, We are Not Yet Equal was nominated for an NAACP Image Award.

In addition to numerous teaching awards, her research has garnered fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Ford Foundation, National Humanities Center, Harvard University’s Charles Warren Center, and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.

She is a regular contributor to The Guardian and advisor for it yearlong series on voting rights.

Organized through the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, the African American Studies Program, Center for Civil War Research, and the Arch Dalrymple III Department of History, the Gilder-Jordan Speaker Series is made possible through the generosity of the Gilder Foundation, Inc. The series honors Richard Gilder of New York and his family, as well as Dan and Lou Jordan of Virginia.

As a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events.

 

Oct
14
Wed
SouthTalks: “Voter Suppression and U.S. Elections” Roundtable Discussion @ Online
Oct 14 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Jim Downs, Carol Anderson, and Kevin M. Kruse present a roundtable discussion on “Voter Suppression and U.S. Elections” at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 14 as part of the Voting Rights and Community Activism series.

In this election year, the Center for the Study of Southern Culture has partnered with the University of Georgia Press to host a roundtable discussion with coeditor of the UGA Press History in the Headlines series and editor of the recently published Voter Suppression in US Elections, Jim Downs. Carol Anderson and Kevin M. Kruse join Downs in this conversation.

Historians have long been engaged in telling the story of the struggle for the vote. In the wake of recent contested elections, the suppression of the vote has returned to the headlines, as awareness of the deep structural barriers to the ballot, particularly for poor, black, and Latino voters, has called attention to the historical roots of issues related to voting access. Perhaps most notably, former state legislator Stacey Abrams’s campaign for Georgia’s gubernatorial race drew national attention after she narrowly lost to then-secretary of state Brian Kemp, who had removed hundreds of thousands of voters from the official rolls. After her loss, Abrams created Fair Fight, a multimillion-dollar initiative to combat voter suppression in twenty states. At an annual conference of the Organization of American Historians, Carol Anderson, Kevin M. Kruse, Heather Cox Richardson, and Heather Anne Thompson had a conversation with Stacey Abrams about the long history of voter suppression at the Library Company of Philadelphia. Voter Suppression in U.S. Elections is a transcript of that extraordinary conversation, edited by Jim Downs.

Jim Downs is the Gilder Lehrman NEH Professor of History and Civil War Studies at Gettysburg College. He is the author or editor of six other books, including Sick from Freedom: African American Illness and Suffering during the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Carol Anderson is the Charles Howard Candler Professor and Chair of African American Studies at Emory University. She is the author of Eyes off the Prize: The United Nations and the African American Struggle for Human Rights, 1944–1955, Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941–1960, White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide, and One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy. She is a regular contributor to the Guardian and advisor for its yearlong series on voting rights.

Kevin M. Kruse studies the political, social, and urban/suburban history of twentieth-century America. Focused on conflicts over race, rights, and religion, he has particular interests in segregation and the civil rights movement, the rise of religious nationalism and the making of modern conservatism. He is the author of White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern ConservatismOne Nation under God: How Corporate America Invented Christian America, and, with Julian Zelizer, Fault Lines: A History of the United States since 1974.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. As a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events.

Oct
19
Mon
SouthTalks with Jelani Cobb: “The Half-Life of Freedom, Race and Justice in America Today” @ Online
Oct 19 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
William Jelani Cobb (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

Journalist and educator W. Jelani Cobb writes about the enormous complexity of race in America. As recipient of the Sidney Hillman Prize for Opinion & Analysis Journalism for his New Yorker columns, Cobb was praised for combining “the strengths of an on-the-scene reporter, a public intellectual, a teacher, a vivid writer, a subtle moralist, and an accomplished professional historian”—qualities he brings to his gripping talks.

Jelani Cobb joined Columbia University’s Journalism School faculty in 2016. He has contributed to The New Yorker since 2012, and became a staff writer in 2015.  Before coming to Columbia, Cobb was an Associate Professor of History and Director of the Africana Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut where he specialized in post-Civil War African American history, 20th century American politics and the history of the Cold War. Dr. Cobb is also a recipient of fellowships from the Fulbright and Ford Foundations.

Dr. Cobb is the author of The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress as well as To the Break of Dawn: A Freestyle on the Hip Hop Aesthetic. His articles and essays have appeared in The Washington PostThe New RepublicEssenceVibeThe Progressive, and TheRoot.com. His collection The Devil and Dave Chappelle and Other Essays was published in 2007, and he is the editor of The Essential Harold Cruse: A Reader, published in 2002.  Born and raised in Queens, New York. He is a graduate of Howard University and Rutgers University where he received his doctorate in American History.

This event is sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture as part of the Future of the South Initiative and the Voting and Community Activism events this fall. Other sponsors include the Division for Diversity and Community Engagement, the College of Liberal Arts, the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College, the School of Law, the Arch Dalrymple III Department of History, the Department of English, the Sociology and Anthropology Department, Department of Political Science and the School of Journalism and New Media.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. As a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events.