Feb
12
Wed
SouthTalks: “TrueSouth” with John T. Edge and Wright Thompson @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Feb 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

TrueSouth with John T. Edge and Wright Thompson

John T. Edge

TrueSouth is an SEC/ESPN series. The documentary-style show explores contemporary southern identity. Each episode leverages Southern Studies ideas and personalities to explore one city through two restaurants.

Wright Thompson is executive producer, and John T. Edge is host. Both will join us to screen their Memphis episode, which features, among others, Zandria Robinson, a former Center for the Study of Southern Culture colleague.

Wright Thompson

John T. Edge directs the SFA, writes about foodways, and teaches in the University of Georgia’s MFA program in narrative nonfiction. Wright Thompson is a writer and filmmaker for ESPN. He lives in Oxford, Mississippi, with his family.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Feb
19
Wed
SouthTalks: “‘All Our Names Were Freedom’: Agency, Resiliency, and Community in Yalobusha County” @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Feb 19 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

“‘All Our Names Were Freedom’: Agency, Resiliency, and Community in Yalobusha County”

Dottie Chapman Reed, with Colton Babbitt, Michelle Bright, Brittany Brown, Keon Burns, and Rhondalyn Peairs

During the fall semester, five students in SST 560, Oral History of Southern Social Movements, taught by Jessie Wilkerson, collaborated with Dottie Chapman Reed to develop the Black Families of Yalobusha County Oral History Project. Reed, who lives in Atlanta, is a member of the University of Mississippi Class of ’74, grew up in Water Valley, and writes the column “Outstanding Black Women of Yalobusha County” for the North Mississippi Herald. In this SouthTalk, the students of SST 560 will present a multivocal, multilayered history based on interviews from their oral history project. Dottie Chapman Reed will speak during the Summit on Women and Civic Engagement sponsored by the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies earlier that day.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Feb
20
Thu
SouthTalks: “Imagine Freedom: Sounding Yanga’s Cry across Gulf Shores” @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Feb 20 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

“Imagine Freedom: Sounding Yanga’s Cry across Gulf Shores” with Dolores Flores-Silva and Keith Cartwright

Dolores Flores-Silva

In the mountains of Veracruz from 1570 to 1609, a young African-born Gaspar Yanga led resistance against the Spanish and forced recognition of his group’s freedom, self-governance, and rights to the land. Yanga’s Freedom Cry addresses the legacy of this Maroon community and its founder through interviews with residents of Yanga, Veracruz, and adjacent towns. The film pays homage to the Africans who won their freedom and examines how Yanga’s triumph and Afro-Mexican legacies still challenge us in spaces shaped by racial legacies across the Gulf.

Dolores Flores-Silva, from the Mexican Gulf state of Veracruz, is professor of Latin American literature and culture at Roanoke College. She writes on topics ranging from Maya poetry to Afro-Mexican history.

Keith Cartwright is chair and professor of English at the University of North Florida and served as Fulbright-Robles Chair of US studies at Universidad de las Américas Puebla.

Keith Cartwright

Cartwright and Flores-Silva are collaborating on a book project and series of documentary films examining the Gulf of Mexico as a transnational region and enduring cross-cultural frontier.

 

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Feb
26
Wed
SouthTalks: “Their Own Kind of Removal: Lumbee Indians in the Antebellum South” @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Feb 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Movement and Migration Series Lecture: “Their Own Kind of Removal: Lumbee Indians in the Antebellum South” with Malinda Maynor Lowery

Malinda Maynor Lowery

For the Lumbee Indians of North Carolina, their long struggle has entailed working through the South’s racial binary and resisting the erasure that seemed an inevitable outcome of Indian Removal. The Lumbees persisted in an increasingly hostile environment by adapting some aspects of white culture, including apprenticeship and marriage, and by building literacy and practicing Christianity. Others participated in black market activities and met social challenges through legal channels. Their efforts provided a sense of social unity that defined their sense of belonging and defined them as a distinct community in a biracial region.

Malinda Maynor Lowery is a professor of history at UNC-Chapel Hill and director of the Center for the Study of the American South. She is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina. She is the author of The Lumbee Indians: An American Struggle.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Mar
4
Wed
SouthTalks: “Racist Kitsch for the Twenty-First Century? Anthropomorphic Asians, Kawaii-style, and the Culture of Cute” @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Mar 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Movement and Migration Series Lecture: “Racist Kitsch for the Twenty-First Century? Anthropomorphic Asians, Kawaii-style, and the Culture of Cute” with Leslie Bow

Leslie Bow

We understand the harm embodied by mammy cookie jars, minstrel coin banks, and any number of household items depicting African Americans during the Jim Crow era, yet these demeaning anthropomorphic objects have found new iterations in the twenty-first century: the global circulation of the Asian figure as saltshaker, kitchen timer, and decor. How is it that such commodities manage to circumvent taboos surrounding ethnic caricature that now surround their infamous progenitors in the US South? How do these new forms of racial kitsch evade contextualization as racist kitsch?

In part, the answer lies in the rise of the Japanese style known as kawaii or “cute style” since the 1970s, an aesthetic form that has specific resonance for Asian racialization. This talk explores the racial feelings that the “cute” enables and draws upon narratives of African American collectors of black memorabilia to engage Asian Americans’ ambivalent relationship to racialized kawaii things.

Leslie Bow is Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Mar
18
Wed
SouthTalks: “Always in Season” with Jacqueline Olive @ Overby Auditorium
Mar 18 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Visiting Documentarians Series: “Always in Season”  with Jacqueline Olive

Jacqueline Olive

Jacqueline Olive is an independent filmmaker and immersive media producer with fifteen years of experience in journalism and film. Always in Season, her debut feature documentary, explores the lingering impact of more than a century of lynching and connects this form of racial terrorism with racial violence today. The film follows Claudia Lacy as she moves from paralyzing grief to leading the fight for justice for her son, Lennon Lacy, who was found hanging from a swing set in rural North Carolina in 2014. As the film unfolds, Lennon’s case—and the suspicions surrounding it—intersect with stories of other communities committed to breaking the silence of their own recent histories and leading the way to justice. This event is cosponsored by the Oxford Film Festival, March 18–22.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. This event is in the Overby Center Auditorium.

Apr
7
Tue
SouthTalks: “You Asked for the Facts” with Mary Blessey @ Overby Auditorium
Apr 7 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

You Asked for the Facts with Mary Blessey

Robert F. Kennedy

In 1966 four years after the historic enrollment of James Meredith at the University of Mississippi, student activists devised a plan to defy Mississippi’s speaker ban and bring Robert F. Kennedy to the university to reveal the truth about former governor and staunch segregationist Ross Barnett.

Mary Blessey is a Mississippi filmmaker and recent graduate of the Center’s MFA in Documentary Expression program. She received her MA in Southern Studies, also from the University of Mississippi, and she is the owner and founder of her production company, Holley Street Media. Her film, You Asked for the Facts, is a component of Blessey’s MFA thesis project.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. (This event will be in the Overby Auditorium.)

Apr
30
Thu
SouthTalks: “LGBTQ+ Activism and Advocacy in Mississippi” @ Butler Auditorium, Inn at Ole Miss
Apr 30 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Future of the South Initiative Lecture: “LGBTQ+ Activism and Advocacy in Mississippi”

Co-hosted by the Isom Center and part of the Oxford Pride schedule, we will hear from advocates and activists about their work to make Mississippi a more welcoming, safer, and fairer state for LGBTQ+ people.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. This event will be in the Butler Auditorium at the Inn at Ole Miss.