Brown Bag Lectures (including performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) occur select days at noon during the fall and spring semesters in Barnard Observatory’s lecture hall, the Tupelo Room.


Mar
20
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: Spiritual Wayfarers, Enslaved and Indigenous Muslims: Past, Present, and Future of American Muslims @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Mar 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

American Muslims have been in the US since its inception, and the enslaved African Muslim population is part of the first wave of American Muslims in our republic. This lecture will navigate through the past, present, and future state of American Muslims and place special emphasis on the rich legacy of American Muslims in the American South who were part of the original Muslim community in America.

Muhammad Fraser-Rahim is an assistant professor in the Department of Intelligence and Security Studies at the Citadel and executive director, North America for Quilliam International, the world’s oldest counter-extremist organization.

He served for more than a decade in the US government writing strategic analytical products for the White House and National Security Council. He holds a Ph.D. from Howard University and is a native of Charleston, SC.

 

The Brown Bag Lecture Series takes place at noon on Wednesdays in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Mar
27
Wed
Oxford Conference for the Book Visiting Documentarian @ Overby Center Auditorium
Mar 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

During the Twenty-Sixth Oxford Conference for the Book, photographer-filmmaker-geographer David Zurick will present an illustrated talk at 3 p.m. based on his new book A Fantastic State of Ruin: The Painted Towns of Rajasthan. A Q&A will follow his talk.

Zurick earned his PhD in geography from the University of Hawaii and the East-West Center, Honolulu. His books and photography have won numerous awards, including the National Outdoor Book Award and Kentucky Arts Council Al Smith Visual Artist Fellowship Award (twice). In 2009 he received the Mount Everest Award for his lifetime achievement in Himalaya studies. He is a fellow of the Explorers Club.

In 2006 Zurick produced the acclaimed Illustrated Atlas of the Himalaya. In 2011 his ten-year photographic study of the American South was published in the book Southern Crossings: Where Geography and Photography Meet. And in 2014 he completed a ten-year series of photographs about sacred places in Tibet and the Himalaya, which are published in his book Land of Pure Vision. For several years he lived in Polynesia, where he made images for his project Oceanic Coordinates: Rising Seas, Losing Paradise. In 2014 he began A Fantastic State of Ruin, a series of color photographs in India, which was published in 2018. His documentary film Crossing Sacred Ground was completed in 2017 and was screened in multiple film festivals.

Apr
3
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: A Soul Comes Home to Her Mississippi Roots @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Apr 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Joye Hardiman is a faculty emerita, educational architect, cultural custodian, world traveler, and ancestral storyteller. She served as the executive director of the Evergreen State College’s Tacoma Campus from 1990 to 2008 and is currently the interim director of the Washington Center for Improvement in Undergraduate  Education. She has done substantive research in Africana history, cultural continuity, world contributions  and spirituality ubiquity  in Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Mali, the Gambia, Ghana, Senegal, Ivory Coast, Cameroon, South Africa, India, the Yucatan, Trinidad, Brazil, Ecuador, Panama, Cuba, and Haiti.

Hardiman will present “A Soul Comes Home to Her Mississippi Roots,” documenting her first return trip to Mississippi. Even though her family left Mississippi during the Great Migration , she was deeply impacted by Emmett Till’s murder. She will place this trip within the broader context of displaced African Americans reconnecting with their roots in the US south.

The Brown Bag Lecture Series takes place at noon on Wednesdays in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Apr
10
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: Saravah! A Trip to the World of Samba de Roda from Bahia @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Apr 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Samba de Roda, which involves music, dance, and poetry, is a popular festive event that took place in the State of Bahia, in the region of the Recôncavo and Sertão in the seventeenth century. The dance is performed on several occasions, such as popular festivities or Afro-Brazilian religious ceremonies, but also performed in more spontaneous contexts.

Jerusa Leão is a Brazilian artist, singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist. Originally from Bahia, Jerusa grew up in the cities of this arid province, beginning her artistic career in 1995. Leão resides in Brazil, performing as a travelling solo singer and researcher of Brazilian culture. She has an ongoing multimedia research project called It’s Just a Shot Away—an exchange of cultural knowledge between Canada and Brazil.

The Brown Bag Lecture Series takes place at noon on Wednesdays in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

 

Apr
11
Thu
Visiting Documentarians Series: Rachel Boillot: Moon Shine: Photographs of the Cumberland Plateau @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Apr 11 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Moon Shine is a collection of photographs by Rachel Boillot that focus on the unique musical traditions of the Cumberland Plateau. This region is home to a rich storytelling heritage, showcased in historic fiddle tunes, balladry, religious gospel pieces, and other songs passed down as part of a formidable oral tradition. Today, this old-time tradition is threatened by the limitations of a twenty-first century attention span and the popularity of commercial music. This project celebrates the creative impulses within the Cumberland Plateau and seeks to document its disappearing traditions. Boillot’s photographs will exhibit in Gammill Gallery in Barnard Observatory from March 4 to April 12. Her lecture will take place at 4 p.m. on April 11 in the Tupelo Room in Barnard Observatory.

Rachel Boillot is a photographer, filmmaker, and educator based in Nashville, Tennessee. Her work explores American culture and narrative traditions. She holds a BA in sociology from Tufts University, a BFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, and an MFA in experimental and documentary arts from Duke University.

Her first monograph Moon Shine: Photographs of the Cumberland Plateau will be published by Daylight Books in April 2019. She recently joined the team at the Kentucky Documentary Photography Project and currently teaches at Belmont University.

Apr
17
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: The Long Southern Strategy: How Chasing Voters in the White South Changed American Politics @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Apr 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Beginning with Barry Goldwater’s Operation Dixie in 1964, the Republican Party targeted disaffected white voters in the Democratic stronghold of the American South. To realign these voters with the GOP, the party capitalized on the white racial angst that threatened southern white control. However—and this is critical—that decision was but one in a series of decisions the GOP made not just on race, but on feminism and religion as well, in what is called here the “long southern strategy.” In the wake of second-wave feminism, the GOP dropped the Equal Rights Amendment from its platform and promoted traditional gender roles in an effort to appeal to antifeminist white southerners, and it politicized evangelical fundamentalist Christianity represented by the Southern Baptist Convention. Over time, that made the party southern, not in terms of place, but in its vision, in its demands, in its rhetoric, and in its spirit. In doing so, it nationalized southern white identity, and that has changed American politics.

Angie Maxwell is the director of the Diane Blair Center of Southern Politics and Society and is the Diane D. Blair Associate Professor of Southern Studies in the political science department at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. She received her PhD in American studies from the University of Texas, Austin, and is the co-chair of the Politics and Policy Caucus of the American Studies Association.

The Brown Bag Lecture Series takes place at noon on Wednesdays in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Apr
24
Wed
Brown Bag Lecture: Jazz At Noon @ Tupelo Room, Barnard Observatory
Apr 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Mark Yacovone, originally from Providence, Rhode Island, now makes his home in Oxford, Mississippi, where he holds a key position in the Yalobushwhackers, the house band for Mississippi Public Radio’s weekly, live, and unrehearsed Thacker Mountain Radio show. Yacovone studied jazz under three-time Latin Grammy nominee Gustavo Casenave and has shared the stage and/or the studio with musical greats Mojo Nixon, Jody Williams, Buddy Cage, Maria Muldaur, Jeff Daniels, Charlie Musselwhite, and Jack Sonni, just to name a few.  Yacovone will end the semester’s Brown Bag series by playing jazz standards and jazz interpretations of several songs you might not expect to hear on piano.

The Brown Bag Lecture Series takes place at noon on Wednesdays in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.