Feb
17
Wed
SouthTalks: “Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems” @ Online
Feb 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Frank X Walker

Frank X Walker will read from and discuss his latest collection of poems, Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems. The poems document in real time the myriad of challenges presented by the multiple pandemics of Covid-19 and racial injustice. They also offer edifying pockets of solace as the poet shares his family’s survival tips, strategies, and discoveries in midst of so much loss, while properly laying blame at the feet of the administration that unnecessarily politicized, misled, and further complicated this country’s response to the virus. University of Mississippi associate professor of English and African American studies Derrick Harriell will facilitate the Q&A portion of this event.

Frank X Walker is the first African American writer to be named Kentucky Poet Laureate. He has published eleven collections of poetry, including Masked Man, Black: Pandemic and Protest Poems and Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers, which was awarded the 2014 NAACP Image Award for Poetry and the Black Caucus American Library Association Honor Award for Poetry. Voted one of the most creative professors in the South, Walker coined the term “Affrilachia” and cofounded the Affrilachian Poets. He is the founding editor of pluck! The Journal of Affrilachian Arts and Culture and serves as professor of English and African American and Africana studies at the University of Kentucky in Lexington.

Derrick Harriell is the Otillie Schillig Associate Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi. His poem collections are Cotton (2010), Ropes (2013, winner of the 2014 Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters award in poetry), and Stripper in Wonderland (2017). His poems, stories, and essays have been published widely.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

Sep
22
Wed
SouthTalks: “Heritage and Hate: Old South Words and Symbols at Southern Universities” @ Online
Sep 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Heritage and Hate: Old South Words and Symbols at Southern Universities

Stephen Monroe and LaToya Faulk

In this SouthTalk, Stephen Monroe and LaToya Faulk will discuss Monroe’s new book, “Heritage and Hate: Old South Words and Symbols at Southern Universities,” which traces the ongoing rhetorical power of Old South words and symbols at southern universities.

Stephen Monroe is chair and assistant Professor in the Department of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Mississippi, where he is an affiliated faculty member in the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, a steering committee member for the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies, and director of the Willie Morris Awards for Southern Writing. His book, “Heritage and Hate: Old South Words and Symbols at Southern Universities,” was published in June as part of the “Rhetoric, Culture, and Social Critique” series from the University of Alabama Press.

LaToya Faulk has a BA in English literature and an MA in rhetoric and writing from Michigan State University. She teaches in the Department of Writing Rhetoric and is also a MFA fiction student at the University of Mississippi. Her work has been published in Scalawag, Southwest Review, Amherst College’s the Common, and Splinter Magazine’s Think Local series.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, many events will be virtual, free, and made accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the event link.

 

Apr
13
Wed
SouthTalks: “Eudora Welty’s Photographic Vision” @ Barnard Observatory Tupelo Room
Apr 13 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Annette Trefzer presents “Eudora Welty’s Photographic Vision” at noon on Wednesday, April 13. Internationally known as a writer, Eudora Welty was also a talented photographer, yet the prevalent idea remains that Welty simply took snapshots before she found her true calling as a renowned fiction writer. But who was Welty as a photographer? What did she see? How and why did she photograph, and what did Welty know about modern photography? In this presentation, Trefzer answers these questions by exploring Eudora Welty’s photographic archive.

Trefzer is a professor of English at the University of Mississippi. She is the author of “Exposing Mississippi: Eudora Welty’s Photographic Reflections” and “Disturbing Indians: The Archaeology of Southern Fiction.” She is coeditor of five volumes in the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Series published by the University Press of Mississippi.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, some events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website at southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more details. Locations listed here are subject to change, and more events may be added throughout the semester. Registration will be required for all virtual events in order to receive the webinar link.