Feb
9
Thu
SouthTalks Film Screening: “Promised Land: A Story about Mound Bayou” @ Overby Auditorium, Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics (555 Grove Loop)
Feb 9 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Film Screening: Promised Land: A Story about Mound Bayou

 

In 1887 two formerly enslaved cousins bought 840 acres of swampland in the Mississippi Delta. Benjamin T. Green and Isaiah T. Montgomery used the site to found Mound Bayou, which went on to prosper as the largest and most self-sufficient all-Black town in the United States. Promised Land: A Story about Mound Bayou “not only tells the history of Mound Bayou, it celebrates the achievements of its residents and contributes to the conversation about its future,” said Claire Winn, director of programs for the Mississippi Heritage Trust, which funded the project alongside the National Park Service and others.

A discussion and Q&A will follow the film screening. Castel Sweet, director of UM Center for Community Engagement, will moderate the discussion, and W. Ralph Eubanks, the Black Power at Ole Miss Faculty Fellow at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, will provide opening remarks. Sweet and Eubanks are joined by Mound Bayou-natives and community leaders, Hermon Johnson Jr., Darryl Johnson, and Hermon Johnson Sr.

Hermon Johnson Jr. is a Mound Bayou native. To support the revitalization of Mound Bayou and the Mississippi Delta area, he cofounded the Mound Bayou Movement nonprofit with his brother, Darryl Johnson, and his father, Hermon Johnson Sr. Hermon is now the executive director of the Mound Bayou Museum of African American Culture and History.

Darryl Johnson is the founding pastor of the Walk of Faith Covenant Church. He is a former mayor of Mound Bayou, one of five founders of Historic Black Towns and Settlements Alliance, and vice president of World Conference of Mayors.

Hermon Johnson Sr. is referred to by many as “the man behind the scenes.” After graduating from Southern A&M College and serving in the military, he moved to Mound Bayou, where he originally worked as a field officer for the Magnolia Mutual Life Insurance Company under Dr. T. R. M. Howard, replacing Medgar Evers. Hermon is former vice mayor of Mound Bayou and cofounder and former president of Delta Housing and Development Corporation.

This event is cosponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture and the Center for Community Engagement.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Feb
15
Wed
SouthTalks: “Great Fiction Needs More Than One Translation: Translating Welty’s Delta Wedding into Japanese” @ Barnard Observatory, Tupelo Room
Feb 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

“Great Fiction Needs More Than One Translation: Translating Welty’s Delta Wedding into Japanese”  presented by Koji Motomura and Annette Trefzer

Koji Motomura, who is currently working on the translation of Eudora Welty’s Delta Wedding into Japanese, will take up various issues surrounding his translation and discuss them with Annette Trefzer. His topics include the overall reception of Welty’s oeuvre in Japan, the Japanese translations of Welty’s major works, a comparison between the two existing Japanese translations of Delta Wedding, and the difficulties and problems of translating Delta Wedding.

Koji Motomura is a professor of English at Komazawa University in Tokyo, Japan. He has written twenty-one articles on American literature and published five literary reviews in journals or magazines in Japan. He is the author of sixteen books in Japanese: fifteen books were written jointly with other scholars, and one book, The Dialogue between Texts: A Reading of William Faulkner and Eudora Welty, is single-authored.

Annette Trefzer is a professor of English at the University of Mississippi. She is the author of Exposing Mississippi: Eudora Welty’s Photographic Reflections and Disturbing Indians: The Archaeology of Southern Fiction. She is coeditor of five volumes in the Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Series published by the University of Mississippi Press.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Feb
16
Thu
SouthTalks: “Vietnamese, Cubans, and Mexicans in the South: An Intertwined History” @ Virtual
Feb 16 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

“Vietnamese, Cubans, and Mexicans in the South: An Intertwined History”  a virtual SouthTalk presented by Perla M. Guerrero

How are the histories of Vietnamese, Cubans, and Mexicans in the South articulated through national policies but defined through regional specificities? Perla M. Guerrero’s talk will focus on the Asian and Latinx communities in Arkansas in the last quarter of the twentieth century to explore placemaking. Guerrero argues that to fully understand the experiences of Asians and Latinxs in the South, we must also understand the history of place-specific ideologies that are at the center of more recent instantiations of racialized relationships.

Perla GuerreroGuerrero is associate professor of American studies and US Latina/o Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research and teaching interests include relational race and ethnicity with a focus on Latinxs and Asian Americans, space and place, immigration and legality, labor, and US history. She has received multiple awards, including a Ford Postdoctoral Fellowship and two fellowships from the Smithsonian Institution. She is working on her second book about deportation and coerced return to Mexico.

This event is cosponsored by the University of Mississippi Center for the Study of Race and Racism.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

Feb
22
Wed
SouthTalks: “Reconciliation: The University and the History of the Ole Miss 89” @ Barnard Observatory, Tupelo Room
Feb 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

“Reconciliation: The University and the History of the Ole Miss 89″ presented by Ralph Eubanks and Amirhea Bishop

On the evening of February 25, 1970, during a performance of the clean-cut and upbeat traveling musical ensemble Up with People, members of the Black Student Union (BSU) engaged in a peaceful protest to get the university to listen to their demands, which included a Black studies program, Black professors and administrators, and scholarships to attract more Black students. Eighty-nine students were arrested that evening and eventually eight of those eighty-nine were expelled. At the time, none of them yet knew they were under surveillance by the FBI and the university.

Ralph Eubanks
W. Ralph Eubanks

W. Ralph Eubanks and Amirhea Bishop will discuss the ways they are seeking to collect and preserve the oral histories of the “Ole Miss 89” and the ways their work is seeking to give the 1970 “Up with People protest” the place it deserves in the history and memory of activism at the University of Mississippi. Ralph Eubanks is the Black Power at Ole Miss Faculty Fellow at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture. A writer and essayist whose work focuses on race, identity, and the American South, his most recent book isA Place Like MississippiA Journey through a Real and Imagined Literary Landscape. 

 

 

 

MiMi Bishop
Amirhea Bishop

Amirhea Bishop is a native of Madison, Mississippi. She is an alumna of Jackson State University and is a first-year MA student in the Center’s Southern Studies program. Amirhea serves as Eubanks’s research assistant for the Black Power at Ole Miss Task Force committee, which documents the stories and preserves the legacy of the Ole Miss 89 through oral histories.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

SouthTalks: Gallery Walk with Allison Grant @ Barnard Observatory, Tupelo Room
Feb 22 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Gallery Walk: “Within the Bittersweet” with Allison Grant

Allison Grant
Allison Grant

Within the Bittersweet is a dark, pastoral narrative about raising children amid concerns about the impacts of climate change and environmental contamination. All the photographs in the exhibition were taken in and around Grant’s home in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where dense vegetation and natural beauty intersect with industrial and fossil-fuel facilities that dot the region. These industries spread noxious particulates and hazardous toxins across the terrain and into the air, water, and our bodies.

In Grant’s artwork, the dark realities of the landscape we live in are interlaced with representations of her deep love for her children and the physical world around them—a living tapestry of incredible complexity that her daughters are just coming to know. The climate crisis will undoubtedly reshape the world they inherit, and through these photographs Grant negotiates the beauty and heartbreak of raising them on a wondrous planet amid such rapid and impactful change.

Allison Grant is an artist, writer, curator, and assistant professor of photography at the University of Alabama. Her artworks have been widely exhibited. She holds an MFA from Columbia College Chicago and BFA from the Columbus College of Art and Design.

baby in shadows purple wisteria hanging down

Mar
1
Wed
SouthTalks: Visiting Documentarian Sarah Garrahan @ Barnard Observatory, Tupelo Room
Mar 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Join documentary editor Sarah Garrahan as she talks about strategies for editing documentary feature films, including working with a team, how not to get overwhelmed, and practical skills that help get films to the finish line.

Sarah Garrahan stares into the distance
Sarah Garrahan

Sarah Garrahan is a documentary producer and editor from San Antonio, Texas. She is based in Los Angeles, California. She co-produced and was an additional editor on the hybrid documentary The Infiltrators by Cristina Ibarra and Alex Rivera, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2019 and was awarded the NEXT Audience and Innovator Awards. She edited the Emmy-nominated feature documentary Building the American Dream by Chelsea Hernandez, which premiered at SXSW in 2019 and was broadcast nationally on PBS. She edited the short documentary Status Pending by Priscilla González Sainz, which was supported by IF/Then Shorts and acquired by Al Jazeera. She edited the feature documentary Silent Beauty by Jasmin López, which premiered at the 2022 Hot Docs Film Festival. She holds an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts from Duke University. She is a former Flaherty Fellow and Felsman Fellow.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

SouthTalks: An African American Dilemma @ Barnard Observatory, Tupelo Room
Mar 1 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

An African American Dilemma: A History of School Integration and Civil Rights in the North presented by Zoë Burkholder

Since Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, Americans have viewed school integration as a central tenet of the Black civil rights movement. Yet, school integration was not the only—or even always the dominant—civil rights strategy. At times, African Americans also fought for separate, Black-controlled schools dedicated to racial uplift and community empowerment.

Zoë Burkholder
Zoë Burkholder

To date, much of what we know about the history of school integration comes from the South. In her book An African American Dilemma: A History of School Integration and Civil Rights in the North, Burkholder offers the first and most comprehensive analysis of the history of Black struggles for educational equality in the North. She argues that since the 1840s, African Americans have employed multiple strategies to fight for equal educational opportunities, including school integration and its opposite—separate, Black-controlled schools. This study considers what is unique about Black struggles for school integration in the North, how these struggles differed from those in the South, and why these regional distinctions matter in shedding light on the complex relationship between school integration and the larger Black freedom struggle.

Zoë Burkholder is an historian of education, professor of educational foundations, and the founding director of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education Project at Montclair State University.

This event will also be available for virtual attendance. Register for the webinar here.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. There are quite a few interesting virtual offerings this semester. Virtual events allow us to connect to larger audiences unable to attend programming in person and allow speakers to participate in the series no matter their location. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events.

Mar
8
Wed
SouthTalks: What Has Been Will Be Again: Place, Time, and the Politics of Remembrance @ Barnard Observatory, Tupelo Room
Mar 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

What Has Been Will Be Again: Place, Time, and the Politics of Remembrance presented by Jared Ragland

In a moment of pandemic, protest, and polarization, photographer Jared Ragland has journeyed across more than twenty-five thousand miles and into each of Alabama’s sixty-seven counties to survey his home state’s cultural and physical landscape. By tracing the Trail of Tears, the Old Federal Road, and Hernando de Soto’s 1540 expedition route, What Has Been Will Be Again contends with Alabama’s fraught past and present and reveals problematic patterns at the nexus of broader American identity. In this presentation, Ragland will discuss the project’s strategic focus on the importance of place, the passage of time, and the political dimension of remembrance as means of confronting White supremacist myths of American exceptionalism.

Jared Ragland is a fine art and documentary photographer and former White House photo editor. His visual practice critically confronts issues of identity, marginalization, and history of place through social science, literary, and historical research methodologies.

The UM Department of Art and Art History and the Do Good Fund helped make this exhibit and presentation possible. Ragland’s exhibit, What Has Been Will Be Again, will show in the Gammill Gallery February 27–March 31, 2023. Ragland has also exhibited his work in a photo essay of the same name in Study the South, the Center’s online scholarly journal.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Mar
22
Wed
SouthTalks: “Truman Capote, Ellen DeGeneres, and Miley Cyrus: Southern Stars and the South’s Queer Myths” @ Student Union Auditorium, Room 124
Mar 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

“Truman Capote, Ellen DeGeneres, and Miley Cyrus: Southern Stars and the South’s Queer Myths” presented by Tison Pugh

How do queer southern celebrities adapt the myths of the South to burnish their star personas? This presentation examines three vastly different queer southern stars—Truman Capote, Ellen DeGeneres, and Miley Cyrus—to consider the ways in which the South’s mythologies influence their presentation of their selves, their star personas, and their sexualities. Capote embodied gothic southern decadence during an era of blanket homophobia, DeGeneres presented herself as an avatar of kindness until the façade crumbled, and Cyrus crossed red state/blue state borders first by enacting the tween fantasies of Hannah Montana and then by representing a new brand of out and proud pansexuality. For each of these celebrities, and for a range of other southern stars, queer or not, the South is inextricably linked to their stardom, and its myths both haunt and inspire their celebrity in myriad fascinating ways.

Tison Pugh with arms folded in front of a glass door
Tison Pugh

Tison Pugh, Pegasus Professor of English at the University of Central Florida, is the author or editor of over twenty volumes. His book The Queer Fantasies of the American Family Sitcom won the 2019 Popular Culture Association John Leo and Dana Heller Award for the Best Work in LGBTQ Studies. He is author of Truman Capote: A Literary Life at the MoviesPrecious Perversions: Humor, Homosexuality, and the Southern Literary Canon, and Queer Chivalry: Medievalism and the Myth of White Masculinity in Southern Literature.

This event is in partnership with the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies and the Center for Inclusion and Cross-Cultural Engagement.

Apr
5
Wed
SouthTalks: “Civil War Memory and the History of Homosexuality” @ Barnard Observatory, Tupelo Room
Apr 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

“Civil War Memory and the History of Homosexuality” presented by Andrew Donnelly

Two developments took place at the end of the nineteenth century: one, a national shift of sympathies retrospectively toward the lost Confederate cause and, two, the emergence of homosexuality as an identity in medicine and the law. This talk brings these two seemingly disconnected phenomena together to narrate how the emergence of homosexuality operated alongside Lost Cause ideology to foster nostalgia for a pre-homosexual and pre–Civil War past.

Andrew Donnelly in a purple shirt
Andrew Donnelly

Andrew Donnelly is a visiting assistant professor of English and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. His work on Civil War–era culture and the history of sexuality has been published in Civil War HistoryAmerican LiteratureWomen’s Studies, and other venues. He also works with the Freedom Project Network in Mississippi and launched their Freedom Summer Collegiate program, which brings PhD students and university faculty members to teach summer courses at the Freedom Projects in Sunflower, Rosedale, and Meridian, Mississippi.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.

Apr
26
Wed
SouthTalks: “Race and the College Mobility Trap” @ Barnard Observatory, Tupelo Room
Apr 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

“Race and the College Mobility Trap” presented by Ryan Parsons

Educators are used to telling students that education, and especially higher education, is a reliable pathway to social mobility. For many students, especially young people of color from disadvantaged communities, this pathway is marked by detours, potholes, and other obstacles to “conventional” success. In this talk, Parsons revisits the idea of “the mobility trap”— situations in which people must choose between mobility options that make sense locally and mobility options that make sense nationally—through interviews with a cohort of current Black college students from Sunflower County, Mississippi. These students are enrolled in a range of institutions from local community colleges to private HBCUs to flagship institutions like the University of Mississippi. How are they doing? What does success in college mean for their social networks at home? What do these successes (and challenges) mean for higher education?

Ryan Parsons wearing a suit
Ryan Parsons

Ryan Parsons is an assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. In his research, Parsons explores how questions of space and race intersect to structure mobility opportunities, especially in rural and depopulated communities. His dissertation was a community study of Sunflower County in the Mississippi Delta, where he spent three years working with a cohort of young people who aspired to go to college. His teaching draws on these experiences as he helps students think critically about what it means to study a community, and in particular a community they have chosen to call home.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted.