Mar
24
Wed
SouthTalks: “Traditional Crafts of Coastal Louisiana” @ Online
Mar 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Arts in Barnard Lecture: “Traditional Crafts of Coastal Louisiana”  with Maida Owens and Janie Luster

Maida Owens

In the talk “Traditional Crafts of Coastal Louisiana,” Louisiana state folklorist Maida Owens will talk about the crafts made by the many traditional cultures found on Louisiana’s Gulf Coast. Some are made from native plants, such as the Spanish moss crafts, decoy carving, and boatbuilding, while others, such as embroidery and cloth dolls, are crafted from traditional textiles. All of these cultures are endangered as a result of increasing population movements due to land loss. Houma Indian Janie Luster will talk about her family traditions of using garfish scales and palmetto basketry. She studied museum artifacts to revive the half-hitch weave.

Basket created by Janie Luster

Maida Owens has been with the Louisiana Division of the Arts since 1986 and manages the state’s folklife program, where she has worked with hundreds of traditional artists and their communities and curates the program’s Folklife in Louisiana website. The program’s current project is the Bayou Culture Collaborative, which helps to sustain the cultures of coastal Louisiana.

Janie Luster is a master palmetto basket weaver and cultural preservationist of the United Houma Nation. Hailing from the community of Bayou DuLarge in Terrebone Parish, Luster comes from a long line of traditional healers and is a tribal advocate.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory unless otherwise noted. However, as a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date-information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events in order to receive the webinar link.

Apr
12
Mon
M.F.A. Artist Talk with Andrea Morales @ Online
Apr 12 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Join M.F.A. candidate Andrea Morales in discussion with Ralph Eubanks as she discusses her thesis project “Roll Down Like Water.”
Andrea Morales is a documentary photographer and journalist born in Lima, Peru and raised in Miami, Florida. Her personal work attempts to lens the issues of displacement, disruption, and everyday magic. Adding glimpses of daily life to the record is central to how she makes work. While earning a B.S. in journalism at the University of Florida and an M.A. in visual communication at Ohio University, she worked as a photojournalist in newsrooms including the New York Times and The Concord Monitor. She is currently a producer at the Southern Documentary Project, an institute of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi and the visual director for the MLK50: Justice Through Journalism.
W. Ralph Eubanks is a visiting professor of Southern Studies, English, and the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College. Eubanks is author of “The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South” and “Ever Is a Long Time: A Journey into Mississippi’s Dark Past,” which Washington Post book critic Jonathan Yardley named as one of the best nonfiction books of the year. Eubanks’s most recent book “A Place Like Mississippi” was published in March 2021.
Mar
9
Wed
SouthTalk: Art in Barnard with Yolande van Heerden @ Barnard Observatory Courtyard
Mar 9 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

At noon on Wednesday, March 9, Yolande van Heerden will give the Art in Barnard Lecture in the Courtyard behind Barnard Observatory. This semester, the Art in Barnard Lecture will complement the Center’s yearlong theme of “Mississippi Voices” by featuring fiber artist and art instructor Yolande van Heerden of Greenwood, Mississippi. Van Heerden teaches a wide range of art classes, including sewing, quilting, and garment/fiber art projects. A native of South Africa, van Heerden celebrates her homeland’s cultural diversity through her community outreach work, and she draws up the richness of its fabric tradition in her own creations. She works as an art teacher for groups of small children, conducts courses in sewing at ArtPlace Mississippi, and has coordinated multiple community-wide quilting projects for organizations including the Museum of the Mississippi Delta.

In her SouthTalk, van Heerden will discuss some of the projects she has led in partnership with the nonprofit ArtPlace Mississippi. Projects have included community fashion shows, featuring clothing sewn by young Greenwood students, several community quilt creations sewn by both children and adults that reflect different social or natural themes, and public art programs, including “silent wind chimes” included in the Katrina Cottage project in Greenwood’s Baptist Town neighborhood and in the Keep Greenwood Strong campaign early in the pandemic.

 SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. This series is free and open to the public, and typically takes place in the Tupelo Room of Barnard Observatory. However, as a result of the ongoing health crisis, some events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel after each live event. Visit the Center’s website at southernstudies.olemiss.edu for more details. Locations listed here are subject to change, and more events may be added throughout the semester. Registration will be required for all virtual events in order to receive the webinar link.

Apr
1
Fri
Artist Talk: Annemarie Anderson @ Barnard Observatory
Apr 1 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Photography Installation Open House

Annemarie Anderson

THIS GARDEN: Oysters and Place In Spring Creek, Florida is an open-house documentary exhibit that showcases oyster farmers in Spring Creek, Florida. Still photographs and audio recordings in this project reveal men and women at work within the bounds of nature. In these images, the Gulf of Mexico is a garden. Humans deeply impact, shape, and manage the animals and plants that live and grow along its inshore environs. Annemarie Anderson is an MFA candidate in Documentary Expression and oral historian for the Southern Foodways Alliance.