About the Gallery

The Gammill Gallery is located in the west wing of Barnard Observatory. Named for Lynn and Stewart Gammill of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, longtime supporters of Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi, the Gammill Gallery hosts a variety of exhibitions devoted to documentary photography of the American South.

The Gammill Gallery has featured the work of numerous photographers, including Bern and Franke Keating, Birney Imes, Jack Kotz, Todd Bertolaet, David Wharton, Wiley Prewitt, and Jane Rule Burdine. Each year, the Gallery exhibits works produced by students in the Southern Studies program.

The Gammill Gallery is open Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., except for University holidays.  For more information, contact us.

Current Exhibit

UNTAMED by Jaime Johnson

Hope and the future for me are not in lawns and cultivated fields, not in towns and cities, but in the impervious and quaking swamps.

– Henry David Thoreau

Aligning with the tradition of Southern Gothic, Jaime Johnson’s Untamed articulates humankind’s capacity to decay as a marker of our identity. Set in the swamps and woods of Mississippi and Louisiana, natural places where one encounters life and death, growth and decay, Untamed depicts the fictitious story of a feral woman and her companions. The woman, interacting with the grotesque and the macabre, takes possession of the very thing that might undo her. Recognizing the deaths of other creatures, this woman observes in death that she, too, will be repurposed and consumed by the earth. Roger Thompson, Associate Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Stony Brook University, writes of Johnson’s photograph Bone Dress that “the stereotypical southern belle dress is transformed into a pile of bones, a startling (if also darkly humorous) reimagining of the Southern woman.”

The cyanotype process shifts focus from potentially colorful landscapes and figures to patterns, textures, and the relationships of forms within the images. Tea-staining the prints dulls the native blue of the cyanotype and adds warmth. Printing on Japanese Kitakata paper, which is prone to ripping, tearing, and wrinkling, reflects the deterioration of nature and gives the prints a feeling of fragility. Untamed ultimately reflects upon the human condition, the forms, the impermanence, and the interconnectedness of natural life.

– Jaime Johnson

Please join us for an artist reception for Johnson on Tuesday, February 9 at 3:30 pm.