Study the South is a peer-reviewed, multimedia, online journal, published and managed by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi. Founded in 2014, Study the South exists to encourage interdisciplinary academic thought and discourse on the American South, particularly through the lenses of social justice, history, anthropology, sociology, music, literature, documentary studies, gender studies, religion, geography, media studies, race studies, ethnicity, folklife, and visual art.

Study the South publishes a variety of works by institutionally affiliated and independent scholars. Like the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, Study the South embraces a diversity of media, including written essays with accompanying audio, video, and photography components; documentary photography; interviews with scholars and artists; video projects; and book reviews.

Founded in 2014, Study the South (www.StudytheSouth.com) exists to encourage interdisciplinary academic thought and discourse on the American South, particularly through the lenses of social justice, history, anthropology, sociology, music, literature, documentary studies, gender studies, religion, geography, media studies, race studies, ethnicity, folklife, and visual art.

Study the South publishes a variety of works by institutionally affiliated and independent scholars. Like the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, Study the South embraces a diversity of media, including written essays with accompanying audio, video, and photography components; documentary photography; interviews with scholars and artists; video projects; and book reviews.

You can find the Center for the Study of Southern Culture‚Äôs mission statement here. For Study the South, this mission means that we are committed to promoting diversity, equity, and inclusion in all aspects of our work. We recognize that the South has a complex history and that scholarship on the region has the potential to reinforce harmful stereotypes and exclusionary narratives. We further recognize that our work contributes to public perceptions of the South and that it is our responsibility to promote an accurate and nuanced understanding of the region.

Therefore, we strive to ensure that Study the South reflects a wide range of perspectives and experiences and engages critically with issues of power and privilege. We actively seek out and publish research that challenges dominant narratives and offers new insights into the diverse histories, cultures, and experiences of the South.

© Center for the Study of Southern Culture