Sep
30
Wed
SouthTalks: “From Latino Orlando to International Memphis: Migration and Transformation in the U.S. South” @ Online
Sep 30 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Simone Delerme and Annemarie Anderson present  “From Latino Orlando to International Memphis: Migration and Transformation in the US South” as part of the Movement and Migration Series.

In this live Q&A at noon, Sept. 30, Annemarie Anderson, Southern Foodways Alliance oral historian, and Simone Delerme discuss Delerme’s recently published book, Latino Orlando: Suburban Transformation and Racial Conflict, and her current work in Memphis. A live Q&A with viewers follows the conversation, available to watch here https://olemiss.zoom.us/j/96942683247

In her prerecorded SouthTalk below, Simone Delerme discusses the findings from her new book, Latino Orlando: Suburban Transformation and Racial Conflict, which documents the ways that southern places are being transformed by an influx of Latino migrants. She will be drawing comparisons to her current research in Memphis, which examines how newcomers challenge the South’s historic black-white racial binary and are incorporated into the social, political, and economic life of communities that were nontraditional destinations of migration.

Simone Delerme joined the University of Mississippi’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Southern Culture in the fall of 2013. She specializes in migration to the U.S. South, with interests in race relations, integration and incorporation, community development, and social class inequalities.

Annemarie Anderson conducts oral history work throughout the South.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. As a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events. The Movement and Migration Series Lectures in the spring of 2020 featured programming around the theme “Movement and Migration in, to, and through the U.S. South” as a way of thinking about urgent issues connected to borders and belonging.

Oct
29
Thu
SouthTalks: “Whose Blues? Black Bluesism, Blues Universalism, and the Postmodern Paradoxes of America’s Global Music” @ Online
Oct 29 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Adam Gussow, Ken “Sugar Brown” Kawashima, and B. Brian Foster present “Whose Blues? Black Bluesism, Blues Universalism, and the Postmodern Paradoxes of America’s Global Music” at 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29.

Ken “Sugar Brown” Kawashima

In this live Q&A, Adam Gussow and Ken “Sugar Brown” Kawashima, a Korean-Japanese American bluesman highlighted in Gussow’s book Whose Blues? Facing Up to Race and the Future of the Music, will be joined by Brian Foster, assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies, for a conversation on Gussow’s book. A prerecorded talk between Gussow, Kawashima, and Foster will be available on the Center’s website by mid-October, and Foster will begin the live Q&A with prepared questions, then open it up to viewers.

Gussow’s book Whose Blues? Facing Up to Race and the Future of the Music challenges us to think freshly about the blues in a postmodern moment, more than a century removed from the music’s rural southern origins. If “blues is Black music,” as some contemporary claimants insist, what should we make of the International Blues Challenge held annually in Memphis, with its all-comers mix of nationalities and ethnicities? If there’s “no Black, no white, just the blues,” as another familiar meme would have us believe, why do some Black blues people hear that proclamation not as a call to transracial fellowship, but as an aggressive attempt at cultural appropriation and the erasure of traumatic racial histories sounded by the music?

Adam Gussow

Adam Gussow is a professor of English and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi and a professional blues harmonica player. He is the author of five books on the blues, including Mister Satan’s Apprentice and Beyond the Crossroads: The Devil and the Blues Tradition. Satan and Adam, a documentary about his decades-long partnership with guitarist Sterling “Mr. Satan” Magee, is currently screening on Netflix.

Ken Kawashima is a professor of modern Japanese history and Marxist theory in the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. He is author of The Proletarian Gamble: Korean Workers in Interwar Japan, co-editor of Tosaka Jun: A Critical Reader, and the English translator of Uno Kozo’s Theory of Crisis. He is also a blues musician, singer, and composer known as Sugar Brown. He has released three albums of original blues music: Sugar Brown’s Sad Day, Poor Lazarus, and It’s a Blues World . . . Calling All Blues.

Brian Foster

Brian Foster is an assistant professor of sociology and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, the Bitter Southerner, and Oxford Magazine. His first book, I Don’t Like the Blues: Race, Place, and the Backbeat of Black Life, which focuses on race and community life in the Mississippi Delta, will be out December 2020.

 

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. As a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events.

 

Nov
11
Wed
SouthTalks:  “Looking at Southern Landscapes: Inspiration, Influence, and Impact” @ Online
Nov 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Ralph Eubanks and David Wharton present  “Looking at Southern Landscapes: Inspiration, Influence, and Impact” at noon Wednesday, Nov. 11.

The southern landscape is varied and contains some places that seem frozen in time and others where time melts along the edges. It is an inspiration to photographers and writers, fueling how one sees the world through a camera and establishing settings for stories. During this prerecorded talk, David Wharton and W. Ralph Eubanks discuss their experiences with the southern landscape, Wharton as a photographer and Eubanks as a writer and student of southern literature. Wharton discusses his book Scenes from Southern Roadsides, which contains 133 black-and-white photographs made in rural areas throughout the American South. Eubanks talks about his forthcoming book, A Place Like Mississippi, which examines how Mississippi’s landscape has influenced the work of its writers. Together they discuss how photographers present the realities of the landscape and how writers overlay their impressions over those realities.

On Nov. 11, both Eubanks and Wharton will engage with viewers and answer questions sparked by their recorded talk, which will be made available on the Center’s website on Nov. 2.

David Wharton

David Wharton has an M.F.A .in photography and a PhD in American studies, both from the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of three books of photographs, with a fourth due to be published in 2021. He has taught at the University of Mississippi’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture since 1999.

Ralph Eubanks is the author of Ever Is a Long Time: A Journey into Mississippi’s Dark Pastand The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South. His essays have been published in theHedgehog Review, the American Scholar, the Virginia Quarterly Review, and the New Yorker. A 2007 Guggenheim Fellow, he is currently a visiting professor of English and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi.

SouthTalks is a series of events (including lectures, performances, film screenings, and panel discussions) that explores the interdisciplinary nature of Southern Studies. As a result of the current health crisis, all events will be virtual, free, and accessible on the Center’s YouTube channel. Visit the Center’s website for up-to-date information about all Center events. Registration will be required for all events