Andrew Mellon Foundation Recognizes Invisible Histories Project

IHP-Mississippi satellite project lauded for oral history research Written by Rebecca Lauck Cleary The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has recognized the work of several University of Mississippi partners through a $300,000 grant supporting the collection, preservation, future research and accessibility of LGBTQ history in Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia. The grant went to the Invisible Histories… Read More >

Diverse Slate of Spring Brown Bag Lectures Begins Today

Weekly sessions starting today cover topics from state politics and civil rights struggles to gay truckers and jazz Written by Rebecca Lauck Cleary The Brown Bag Lunch and Lecture Series sponsored by the University of Mississippi’s Center for the Study of Southern Culture continues this spring with topics ranging from Brazilian dance to gay truck… Read More >

Get your master’s degree in Southern Studies

The University of Mississippi had the first MA program in Southern Studies, with the first students entering the program in 1986. The Southern Studies graduate program is a two-year interdisciplinary program, with faculty in literature, history, sociology, anthropology, music, foodways, religion, documentary studies, and other fields. Set in the Center for the Study of Southern… Read More >

Catarina Passidomo Receives Fulbright Award to Study Foodways in Peru

University of Mississippi professor Catarina Passidomo is looking forward to traveling to Lima, Peru, to teach and conduct research in 2019 as the recipient of a Fulbright US Scholar award. While in Lima, the UM assistant professor of anthropology and Southern Studies will teach two courses in the Department of Social Sciences at the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. She also plans to engage in independent and collaborative research on Peruvian cuisine and foodways for a project titled “Gastrodiplomacy in Peru: Cuisine as Nation-Brand in Postcolonial Context.”

Center Director Named William Winter Professor of History

Ted Ownby, Center Director

As director of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi, Ted Ownby fulfills many roles. He recently added one more to the list as the university’s William F. Winter Professor of History.

In 1992, the University of Mississippi Foundation established an endowment fund to promote and recognize excellence in historical scholarship and to honor former Gov. William F. Winter, a staunch supporter of public education.

New STUDY THE SOUTH Essay by Dr. Adam Gussow – “Blues Expressiveness and the Blues Ethos”

The blues—as a palette of intense, often contradictory feelings; a range of social conditions heavily inflected by blackness and southernness; an expressive form encompassing literature as well as music; and a philosophical orientation towards experience—are a more complex cultural phenomenon than some realize. This essay unpacks the latter two concepts: blues expressiveness and the blues ethos. Blues expressiveness is constituted by a range of cultural practices, including the AAB stanza, call and response procedure, vocalizations, blues-idiomatic language, and signifying. The blues ethos, too, offers multiple strategies for surviving bad times by refusing to reify the down-ness of the present moment as an inescapable condition, sometimes with the help of harsh, redemptive laughter. In this essay, Adam Gussow draws on a range of lyric, literary, and folkloristic commentary by Langston Hughes, Cornell West, Bessie Smith, Howard Odum, Kalamu ya Salaam, W. C. Handy, Angela Y. Davis, Lonnie Johnson, and many others. The essay also takes an autobiographical turn as Gussow mines his own bandstand and classroom experience with Mississippi-born blues performers Sterling “Mr. Satan” Magee and Bill “Howl-N-Madd” Perry to illustrate the blues ethos in action.